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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


May 2014

May 29, 2014

On May 28, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker announced the first 12 communities that have been selected to participate in the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership (IMCP). Joining forces with many partners across the region, San Diego is included in the Southern California Designation, which was led by a team out of the University of Southern California Center for Economic Development.

The IMCP program is an initiative designed to revolutionize the way federal agencies leverage economic development funds by encouraging communities to develop comprehensive economic development strategies that will strengthen their competitive edge for attracting global manufacturing and supply chain investments.

“The 12 Manufacturing Communities announced today represent a diverse group of communities with the most comprehensive economic development plans to attract business investment that will increase their competitiveness,” said U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker. “IMCP is a critical part of our ‘Open for Business Agenda’ to strengthen the American manufacturing sector and attract more investment to the United States. Innovative programs like IMCP encourage American communities to work together to craft  strong, clear, strategic plans to attract manufacturing investment and jobs to transform themselves into globally competitive commercial hubs.”

So what exactly does this mean for San Diego and the Southern California region? As home to the world’s largest concentration of military personnel and with more than 80 percent of the state’s aerospace workers, the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership of Southern California Manufacturing Community (AMP SoCal) will concentrate on further transforming the aerospace and defense industry. Home to companies including Northrop Grumman, the Southern California region is positioned to be in the vanguard of  future avionics and aerospace industries.

Of course, you can’t become a leader in aerospace and defense without the workforce to get you there. Part of the strategy will involve a significant workforce training component that will partner with local colleges and universities to streamline certificate programs. The strategy also focuses on building a supplier network, research and innovation, infrastructure and site development. The strategy will also focus on creating an export acceleration workshop, which dovetails nicely into the Global San Diego Export plan, which was released in conjunction with the Brookings Institution this year.

On the local front, the partnership involves the City of San Diego, CONNECT, UC San Diego, Cleantech San Diego, San Diego East County Economic Development Council, San Diego Workforce Partnership and San Diego Regional EDC.

Following the success of last year’s MFG Day, on Oct. 3, many of the partners listed above will team up with local companies as they open their doors to the public to showcase an industry that supports nearly 90,000 local jobs. Stay tuned for more details.

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May 20, 2014
San Diego Digital Ambassadors Everybody recognizes San Diego’s enviable weather, but one of our greatest competitive strengths lies in the people who call this place home. San Diego is full of really smart people solving hard problems, making cool things and changing lives. This is the story we need to tell.
 
So, we've gone straight to the source. The videos below are part of our broader workforce talent attraction and retention efforts. They are not branded to EDC. We encourage you to share the videos on social media using the hashtag #GoSanDiego and stay tuned for information about a new talent attraction website, vimeo channel and our digital ambassadors program.

Tweet Worthy:

  • "We were in Vegas, but we saw a huge opportunity here...so we moved our company to DT SD"
  • Why SD? "We wanted to be around companies we could collaborate with & bounce ideas off of"

In search of opportunity and quality of life, Brandisty co-founders Alex Rolek and Michael Sacca decided to move their company from Las Vegas to San Diego. What they found in San Diego is an attainable quality of life and a growing startup community that fosters collaboration. 

 

Tweet Worthy:

  • "I can only see that SD's tech community is going to get bigger and better"
While at UC San Diego, David Fischer became fascinated with home brewing after exposure to the growing San Diego craft beer movement.  Back then, he had an equally fascinating internship as a developer at Qualcomm. After successfully progressing at Qualcomm, he took a job at Amazon in Irvine and commuted via train. Fast forward a few years: David learned of a job opportunity here in San Diego combining two things he loves: programming and craft beer. This is David’s story at TapHunter, one of San Diego’s many growing startups.
 

Meet David Fischer, TapHunter from GoSanDiego on Vimeo.

Check out TapHunter and download the app: TapHunter.com

 

 

 

May 16, 2014

This post is part of an ongoing monthly blog series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release.

2014_04_Unemployment

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the April 2014 period. The big headline in this month’s report is that San Diego County's unemployment rate has dropped nearly a full percentage point, down to 6.0 percent from 6.9 percent in March 2014 and 7.2 percent in April 2013. While this number appears encouraging, it is also noteworthy that the labor force lost 25,000 workers. This is the single largest month-to-month drop in the labor force on record (since 2000), and the lowest the labor force has been since October 2011. Meanwhile, the economy added 2,900 nonfarm jobs from March to April, which makes this month's report particularly perplexing. 

There are several possible explanations for this drastic decline in the labor force. First and most commonly, many long-term unemployed have simply given up looking for work or found work outside of the San Diego region. This most likely explains the 16,000 unemployed who exited the labor force. There may also have been less people who decided to enter the labor force, possibly out of lack of confidence in employment opportunities or lack of relevant skills. However, we also saw 9,000 employed persons leave the labor force, presumably because of a combination of retirements, seasonal exits and moves to other regions. It is not uncommon to see the labor force seasonally decline from March to April, just not to this magnitude. 

2014_04_LF

It appears contradictory that despite this massive labor force decline, the economy actually added jobs. It is worth noting that from February to March, the economy added 12,400 jobs while the labor force lost 11,200 workers. This is likely due to a discrepancy in the surveying, since labor force numbers come from household surveys and job numbers come from surveys of businesses. It is also possible that those who were employed found second jobs. The result is likely a mix of all of these factors, which leaves us with an unusual report for April.

As noted, the economy added 2,900 jobs total from March to April 2014. The private sector outperformed by adding 3,400 jobs in the month, with government job decline accounting for the 500 less jobs. Service providing industries added most of the jobs, while we saw job losses from the goods producing industries like construction and manufacturing.

2014_04_Total

The job picture looks even more promising when compared to last year. From April 2013 to April 2014, the economy added 29,000 jobs, a 2.2 percent increase. The private sector added 26,600 jobs over the year and we saw positive growth in the manufacturing and construction industries, which added 1,100 and 4,300 jobs, respectively. The 4,300 construction jobs added constitutes a 7.2 percent increase over the year. We also saw growth in our important traded economies, with leisure and hospitality adding 4,300 jobs and professional, scientific and technical services adding 6,200 jobs.

We will likely need to wait until future job reports to determine if this unusual report is an anomaly or an indication of larger trends. Historically, we have seen the labor force continue to decline or remain relatively flat from April to May, but with the recent major change in labor force amidst job creation, we may see people coming back to the labor force in the coming months.

Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how this compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.