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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


Economic Drivers

April 3, 2013

What Makes San Diego an Ideal Home for Your Business?

 

Regional leaders will convene soon to participate in a unique process designed to determine priorities for the region that will ultimately "roll up" to help set a state-wide agenda to revitalize California. The forum, sponsored by San Diego Gas & Electric, will highlight projects that illustrate how local assets, policies and economic development tools led to successes and job growth. The audience will use interactive voting devices to prioritize policy matters in the areas of workforce, innovation, infrastructure, regulatory process, and capital. The discussion and findings will be summarized into recommendations that will inform the development of a regions-driven shared agenda for state action through the California Economic Summit process.

The event is one of 16 local forums taking place across California. The California Economic Summit uses a "triple-bottom-line" model based on economic, social and environmental factors that affect prosperity. Prosperity is defined as a function of good jobs, rising incomes, and community health. Good jobs offer opportunity for upward mobility. Rising incomes for all Californians demonstrates that prosperity is widely shared. Community health includes quality of place, health and environment. Maintaining and enhancing the productivity of natural resources - both as ecosystems and economic drivers - is key to maintaining California's vitality now and in the future.

With input from the San Diego region (which includes San Diego County and Imperial County) and the other regional forums, a steering committee will identify widely shared priorities and convene action teams to work on specific plans to address the priorities.

As part of the forum, a case study on the Sunrise Powerlink will be presented to illustrate how one project can impact job growth throughout an entire mega-region.

For more information about the California Economic Summit, see the San Diego Forum Briefing Book.

March 27, 2013

San Diego Regional EDC and a number of partners from industry organizations and private companies are working to attain status as a center of excellence (COE) for unmanned systems. San Diego is already well known for developing and manufacturing unmanned autonomous systems (UAS). The industry supports more than 7,000 jobs and accounts for more than 12 percent of all Department of Defense contracting activities in San Diego County, according to an industry report prepared by the San Diego North Chamber of Commerce. The report also concluded that the industry has the potential to double its economic impact over the next seven years. Recently, Northrop Grumman announced that the company would designate its Rancho Bernardo facility as their center of excellence for UAS development. The move is expected to bring an additional 300 jobs to the San Diego region.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued the request for information. They intend to designate six Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) test sites across the Continental United States in order to integrate UAS into national airspace.

The geographic area of the proposed site encompasses a vast area of land extending from Edwards Air Force Base and the Naval Air Weapons Station at China Lake south to the Mexican border and east to the Arizona border. The regional coalition includes San Diego Military Advisory Council, Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems, Imperial Valley EDC, County of Imperial, Holtville Airport in Imperial County, and defense contractors including General Atomics, Cubic, Epsilon Systems and Northrop Grumman. This group joined forces with the California Unmanned Air Systems Portal, based in Indian Wells in Riverside County, which enabled the proposal to include such a large area. The proposed test range region is geographically diverse, including airspace over mountain ranges, high and low desert, and the ocean.

About 40 applications have been submitted seeking to become one of the six test sites.

 

 

March 12, 2013

175 projects. 6, 215 jobs. What a year 2012 was. Check out our annual report, detailing some some of the highlights and programs from last year.

To all of our investors, partners and the rest of the San Diego business community, thank you for helping us carry out EDC’s mission is to maximize the region’s economic prosperity and global competitiveness. 

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March 12, 2013

Malin Burnham, Irwin Jacobs and Ernest Rady recently had a chat about the future of San Diego in front of the 700 people attending USD’s Annual Burnham Moores Real Estate Conference. One idea in particular, that San Diego can become the medical center of the Southwest US, has all the characteristics of an achievable dream: the right target, a solid foundation of resources, and current growth that can propel the idea to reality.

These men put their philanthropy behind the key ingredients needed to build a medical powerhouse. The Burnham, Rady and Jacobs names can be found on research institutes (Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute), state-of-the-art existing healthcare centers (Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego), and the emerging UC San Diego Jacobs Medical Center which envisions putting “the world’s best medical care in our backyard.”

Combine this medical research and clinical infrastructure with San Diego’s developing wireless health sector and you’ve got a compelling vision for future economic growth based around healthcare. For example, Qualcomm Life, a Qualcomm company, is working on device connectivity and data management to enable medical device manufacturers to deliver wireless health applications quickly and easily to those who need it.

Health services already employ 10 percent of San Diego’s workforce – including 7,000 physicians. Current employment numbers for healthcare in the region do not include life sciences or wireless health. As biotech, information technology and health service delivery increasingly intersect, employment in this super-sector will become an even more central economic driver. To prepare for the future, major healthcare construction projects are underway in the region. The four largest projects account for nearly $1.5 billion in contracts and 14,000 onsite jobs.

In addition to Rady Children’s Hospital and UC San Diego Health System, San Diegans have a range of choices for healthcare including Scripps Health, Sharp HealthCare, and Kaiser Permanente. What will drive national and international interest and demand is the growing number of nationally ranked specialties. Currently, UC San Diego Medical Center has nationally ranked specialties in Pulmonology, Nephrology, Geriatrics, and Urology. Scripps La Jolla Hospitals and Clinics have national rankings in Cardiology and Heart Surgery.

 

March 1, 2013

A message from Mark Cafferty

 
As you are aware, the law of sequestration will likely take effect today. The result – essentially a 10 percent across-the-board cut of all federal programs, projects and activities – will bring a dense rolling wave of financial implications for our region.
 
The impact to our military economy is significant. The impact to our innovation economy is troubling. The impact to our tourism economy compounds the problem we already have with the region’s TMD standoff. Effects throughout the local economy will be felt in the coming months and thousands of jobs are at risk, quickly making this a harsh reality for families and businesses across the region.
 
These cuts have the potential to set back medical research and our innovative economy by a generation or more, according to former NIH director Dr. Elias Zerhouni. Imagine all that will be lost – life-altering innovations, technological breakthroughs, not to mention jobs and businesses. There will be immediate impacts, for sure. We’re already seeing some. But the long-term effect – the slow and steady burn – is what really has the potential to hurt San Diego most. 
 
Our partner Larry Blumberg, Executive Director of the San Diego Military Advisory Council (SDMAC), put it this way: “Defense contractors are going to be the first ones let go — and we know some of them are already starting to receive pink slips. In mid-April, the Department of Defense is going to furlough civil servants one day a week. This would impact 25,000 San Diegans, and a day’s pay for each of them is a lot of money to take out of the local economy.”
 
Just this past Tuesday, EDC received notice from GD NASSCO that the company has informed 1,040 employees in San Diego, Norfolk and Mayport that layoff notices would likely be issued in early April. Notices from BAE, Continental Maritime and other shipbuilders also have been received by our office over the past month totaling an additional 1,321 job losses. The job numbers are real and estimated to total more than 5,500 in the shipbuilding industry alone.  
 
It’s also worth noting that sequestration is only one of the challenges coming out of Washington.  We face additional threats in the weeks ahead.
 
On March 27th, the current continuing resolution (CR), the mechanism through which the federal government draws funds it needs to operate, will expire. A federal government shutdown is on the horizon without a new CR in place before the end of March.
 
At some point toward the end of March, President Obama is expected to deliver a budget for fiscal year 2014. Based on everything we are hearing in Washington, I believe a request for another round of base realignment and closures (BRAC) will likely be included within that 2014 budget.
 
On May 19th, the current debt ceiling will be reached, which represents an unprecedented fourth fiscal event in three months with serious implications for the country and San Diego’s economy.
 
There is plenty our region must do. EDC, SDMAC, the Chamber of Commerce, CONNECT, BIOCOM and other partners are ramping up efforts in Washington, Sacramento and throughout the region to ensure that our military and innovation economies are protected. We thank you all for your interest and support to date. As always, we will work to keep you informed of both the implications and challenges we face, along with our plans for addressing them in the weeks ahead. 
 
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February 28, 2013

If you ask most U.S. sports fans to identify the fiercest rivalry in professional sports, many would quickly say, “Yankees and Red Sox.” Fans for both teams are incredibly loyal, united both in their regional pride and mutual distaste for the competition. But when you look closer at the actual numbers, it isn’t really a rivalry at all…in the past century, New York has clenched 27 World Series compared to four for Boston.

As a native Bostonian (side note: he now considers himself a proud San Diegan), Mark made it clear today at a breakfast forum hosted by the San Diego Press Club that this is very similar to California’s “rivalry” with Texas. In this scenario, California is the New York of job creation. Although both sides may have loyal contenders, when you look at the success Texas has had poaching jobs from the Golden State, there is no comparison. The numbers speak for themselves. California is leading the nation in private sector job creation. It is No. 1 in biotech, agriculture, high tech, entertainment and tourism.

As California and San Diego continue to face criticism from out-of-state politicians, the press and others for its “anti-business” policies, we must remember one critical fact. Time and time again, studies have shown that short-term economic incentives do nothing for long-term job growth. Yes, it’s fair to say that California could benefit from more business-friendly policies, but in San Diego, our traded economies –– military, tourism and innovation – are anchors for our growing economy.

All of that said, Mark told s crowd of about 40 local business leaders today, it’s not Gov. Perry’s $24K media buy that worries us, but some actual reforms/legislation (or lack thereof) that does:

●     TMD controversy— Removing ourselves from the legal side of this battle, we are looking at the sheer importance of these dollars for regional economic development. San Diego’s tourism industry is responsible for $18.3 billion in economic impact and employs 160,000 San Diegans. In 1993, Colorado eliminated its TMD, resulting in a 30 percent drop in its share of the U.S. travel market over four years.

●     Enterprise Zone Reforms—Although poaching jobs from other states and grandiose economic incentives don’t help long term growth, the EZ is a powerful growth tool for California helping companies like Soitec and the Wheat Group.

●     Sequestration/ Military Cuts—With the highest concentration of military in the world and 60 percent of California’s military assets, sequestration will be a devastating blow to San Diego’s economy, with approximately 30,000 jobs at stake. Many people also don’t realize the impact it would have on the high-tech and life sciences industries as well.

As Mark told the Press Club at the New School of Architecture + Design, at San Diego Regional EDC, our job is to attract, retain and expand businesses in the region. Everything we do, whether it’s advocating for certain policies or implementing strategic programs, is to grow jobs across the region.

And create jobs we do! In 2012, San Diego Regional EDC worked on 175 projects, creating 8,550 jobs in the region.

In addition to releasing the job numbers today, Mark stressed that San Diego needs to do more promoting and less comparing. Too often, San Diegans get caught up in comparisons with New York, Chicago, San Francisco and other great cities instead of focusing on the fact that San Diego is one of the very best places in the world for families and businesses.

He closed with one wish for San Diego: “gaining a little bit of confidence and whole lot of swagger.”

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February 26, 2013

Mayor Bob Filner was the SD Press Club's first Newsmaker of 2013; Mark Cafferty will be its second. Join the San Diego business and journalism community for a breakfast this Thursday, Feb. 28 at 7:30 a.m. Mark will provide new EDC updates including the recent successes the organization has had generating and maintaining jobs throughout the region. He also will tell you how he really feels about attempts to lure businesses from California to Texas, and you'll get the latest update on efforts in Washington to curtail across-the-board budget cuts (known as Sequestration) scheduled to take effect Friday. You won't want to miss it.

Everyone is welcome! Please find more details and RSVP here

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February 21, 2013

San Diego Venture Group gathered a diverse panel of San Diego-based venture capitalists recently to talk about their focus, how they spend their time, and what they recognize as red flags for prospective investments.

Jason Brown of Thomas McNerney & Partners made the first meeting/first date comparison with the comment that the venture investor/company relationship is like a marriage of sorts, except that you don’t want it to last … Compatibility is important when you’re going to spend so much time together. Brown concentrates on life sciences investing which carries huge risks and costs. “Getting to ‘yes’ is difficult. The elements of risk have to be achievable,” Brown said, “We have to look at clinical risk, scientific risk, regulatory risk, commercial and competitive risk.” Later, when a question came up about healthcare reform, he added reimbursement risk to the list. Despite these daunting odds, Brown said he spends as much as 50 percent of his time looking at new investments.

Steve Hamerslag of TVC Capital invests in software and software services. TVC Capital looks for investments where there is already $2 - $10 million in revenues and the company has reached a point where it is time to professionalize the organization. Hamerslag said TVC invests anywhere from $4 - $10 million in each company and expects to take an active mentoring role. Red flags for Steve? Issues with bad management or trust and inconsistent answers to questions about the business. He spends about 20 – 25 percent of his time looking at new deals and said that a recommendation from a trusted source really helps a company get his attention.

Afif Khoury of Scatter Ventures invests in many different areas. A quick look at the firm’s portfolio shows everything from farming to pharma. He spends about 20 percent of his time looking at new investments and will probably make two new investments in the next 12 months. Red flags for Afif? Too rosy an outlook and overselling. When asked what was most important – team, idea or opportunity, he answered that all are important. While he made it clear that Scatter invests in people, they’re looking for markets as well as management.

David Wise of Qualcomm Labs invests both internally (Qualcomm Life, Qualcomm’s wireless health subsidiary, originated in Qualcomm Labs) and externally with a focus on platforms that will drive new business for Qualcomm technologies. Wise spoke about their venture with EvoNexus, an incubator program within CommNexus where Qualcomm Labs @ EvoNexus has funded three companies. Wise says creating companies outside the walls of Qualcomm gives small start-ups more freedom while still having access to Qualcomm’s business and technology resources. Wise estimates he spends 30 – 40 percent of his time looking at new investments.

San Diego Venture Group and San Diego Regional EDC share office space. It’s great to have someone as knowledgeable as Dave Titus, SDVG’s President, within easy reach. Access to capital is a key requirement to maintaining and growing an innovation economy. Dave’s insight and connections within the industry help us work more effectively with entrepreneurs.

February 8, 2013

 

With more than 660 theaters in 52 countries across the globe, IMAX has established itself as an innovative name in the entertainment, technology, and distribution sphere. In 1973, when IMAX was in search of a location to erect its first dome theater, it seemed logical to do it in an innovative city like San Diego.
 
40 years and myriad movie theaters later, IMAX executives are back in San Diego as part of CommNexus’ MarketLink program. The program, which connects innovative regional companies with multinational corporations, provides another outlet for emerging businesses to showcase their technology to companies such as LG, SONY Electronics, Motorola Mobility, Verizon Wireless and British Telecom.
 
IMAX executives, Canadian Consulate representatives, and San Diego elected officials recently had the opportunity to link up and celebrate this innovation milestone at the site of the first dome theater, the Ruben H. Fleet Science Center. City of San Diego Mayor Bob Filner was on hand to emphasize his appreciation of companies like IMAX that continue to place value in San Diego, and also commented on the dynamic economic ecosystem that is encouraged by programs like MarketLink.  As chair of the City's Economic Development Committee, Councilmember Sherri Lighter also discussed the importance of maintaining the region’s competitive edge through generating new ideas and establishing new businesses.  
 
The anniversary also highlighted the important longstanding relationship between San Diego and Canada. Canadian Consul General David Fransen noted that IMAX was not the first Canadian company to participate in MarketLink. Research in Motion — which recently changed its name to BlackBerry after its signature device – came to San Diego in 2010. With support for other regional programs including WBT Innovation Marketplace, Canada—and through its regional consulates— has demonstrated a strong partnership between the two locales.
 
If the longstanding relationship between IMAX and San Diego tells us anything, it’s that we don’t see this partnership slowing down anytime soon. 
 
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February 6, 2013

 

Statement from Mark Cafferty,  president & CEO of the San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation, on Texas Governor Rick Perry's attempts to lure businesses out of California:
 
“At EDC we spend our days attracting, growing and retaining businesses. People choose to do business here because we are San Diego…because we are California, and because we have created a synergy and culture like no other. Companies make investments where big things happen, and big things happen here.
 
"Can California take steps to be more business friendly? Absolutely, but the fact remains that we are still number one in biotechnology, agriculture, high-tech, entertainment, foreign direct investment, and the list goes on and on. In San Diego, we are home to one of the nation’s most diverse economies, anchored by the largest military installation in the world.
 
"We are always open for business in San Diego and we welcome Governor Perry’s tourism dollars anytime he wants to drop into town.”
 
 
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