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November 3, 2014

Earlier this month, EDC released its Manpower Monthly Employment Report. Since then, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has released September employment data on all U.S. metros, which allows us to analyze some key indicators across geographies. Click on images to enlarge in a new window/tab.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • At 5.9 percent, San Diego’s unemployment rate ranked 16th among the 25 most populous U.S. metros.
  • From September 2013 to September 2014, San Diego's unemployment rate fell by -1.4 percentage points, which ranked 8th among the 25 most populous U.S. metros.
  • Since the end of the recession (June 2009), San Diego's unemployment rate has fallen by 4.1 percentage points, which is greater than the U.S. average.
  • San Diego's employment grew by more than 2.5 percent from September 2013 to September 2014, which ranked 9th among the 25 most populous U.S. metros.
  • From September 2013 to September 2014, San Diego's employment in professional, scientific and technical services (PST) grew by 7.2 percent, the 2nd fastest growth among major U.S. metros.
  • Manufacturing in San Diego grew more than 2.6 percent from the previous year, which is faster than both the overall employment growth and the U.S. manufacturing average.

[Unemployment Chart]

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) recently released employment data for the September 2014 period for all U.S. metro areas. At 5.9 percent, San Diego County’s unemployment rate fell by 1.4 points from this time last year. San Diego's rate ranked 16th among major U.S. metros and was slightly above the U.S. overall rate of 5.7 percent. However, San Diego's rate fell faster than most. San Diego's percentage point change from September 2013 to September 2014 ranked 8th among major U.S. metros. While the unemployment rate in San Diego was higher than some of the region's key peer metros, it still fared better than other California metros like Los Angeles and Riverside, and fell roughly in the middle of the 25 most populous U.S. metros.

[Employment Chart]

When looking at employment growth, San Diego fared better than most. From September 2013 to September 2014, the region's employment grew by more than 2.5 percent, which ranked 9th among the 25 most populous U.S. metros. The U.S. average growth rate was less than 2 percent, and only two U.S. metros, Houston and Dallas, grew by more than 3 percent.

[PST Chart]

While San Diego's overall growth is very positive, we saw more explosive growth in one of the region's most important sectors. Professional, scientific and technical services (PST) is a sector of the economy very heavily associated with the region's innovation clusters. Much of the companies and employment in clusters like biotechnology, biomedical products, cleantech and information technology fall within the PST sector. From September 2013 to September 2014, employment in the region's PST sector grew by 7.2 percent, more than double the U.S. average of 3.2 percent. San Diego ranked second among the 25 most populous U.S. metros in this measure, which is a positive sign for the region's key traded clusters.

[MFG Chart]

Manufacturing is another key industry for growth in the region, not only because manufacturing jobs are accessible and pay well, but also because certain manufacturing subsectors are critical to the region's innovation clusters. From September 2013 to September 2014, manufacturing employment grew by 2.6 percent, which was faster than the region's overall growth rate. San Diego's manufacturing employment grew at twice the rate of the U.S., and recorded the 9th highest growth rate among major U.S. metros. 

As we discussed in the Manpower Monthly Employment Report earlier this month, San Diego's economy is experiencing strong positive employment growth. That point is even more apparent now that we can observe that growth in the context of San Diego's peers. While the unemployment rate isn't as comparatively low as we would like to have seen, Summer-to-Fall seasonal effects are often felt more strongly in San Diego, given the region's large tourism industry. We've generally seen the unemployment rate track at or below the U.S. average, and don't expect that to change much in the near future.

Thank you to Manpower-SD for their ongoing support of EDC's employment trends research.

October 17, 2014

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This post is part of an ongoing monthly series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release and is brought to you by Manpower. Click images to enlarge in a new tab/window.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Monthly data for September is highly susceptible to seasonal changes, so month-to-month employment changes should be viewed in that context.
  • At 5.9 percent, San Diego’s unemployment rate fell in September by 0.3 percentage points from August. In addition, unemployment was down 1.4 points from September 2013.
  • San Diego’s unemployment rate was lower than the California average, and slightly above the U.S. average.
  • The region lost 2,800 seasonal jobs from August to September, but added 33,300 jobs since last year.
  • Seasonal effects limited monthly employment growth in most private industries, but manufacturing, education services and professional and business services added jobs in September.
  • Staffing services grew by 4.7 percent since last year and nearly two percent this month, indicating demand for hiring services.
  • San Diego’s traded economies (Innovation, Defense and Tourism) continued to drive annual employment growth.

[Unemployment Chart]

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the September 2014 period. At 5.9 percent, San Diego County’s unemployment rate dropped 0.3 points from August to September, and fell by 1.4 points from this time last year. The unemployment rate in the region remained a full point below California’s 6.9 percent rate and tracked just above the U.S. average of 5.7 percent. While the region experienced a decline of more than 11,000 in its labor force, much of this can be pinned on seasonal effects, as temporary summer workers fall out of the labor force. Since September of last year, the labor force gained 11,100 people, 33,900 more people have identified as employed, and 22,200 less people have identified as unemployed, indicating positive momentum in the labor market.

[Employment Chart]

When looking at employment changes, September seasonal effects played a role here as well. From August to September, the region’s total employment fell by 2,800 jobs, with the private sector falling by 7,400 jobs. Private sector losses were partially offset by 4,500 public sector education workers returning to their jobs. While these numbers appear threatening, it can be almost entirely pinned on seasonal losses in common summer growth industries like construction and tourism. When looking at year-over-year growth, we see that San Diego added 33,300 jobs, 32,400 of which are from the private sector. San Diego continued to out-pace national growth as well. Employment from September 2013 to 2014 grew by approximately 2.5 percent overall and three percent in the private sector, while the U.S. grew by about a half point slower.

[PST Chart]

San Diego’s traded economies continued to drive much of the region’s employment growth. Professional, scientific and technical services (PST), heavily associated with innovation, was one of the few industries to add jobs in the down season. The industry added 600 jobs since August 2014. More importantly, PST added 8,900 jobs since September 2013, a growth rate of 7.2 percent, which is nearly three times the economy-wide 2.5 percent growth rate. PST includes subsectors like scientific research and development services, which is a key driver of our life sciences. This subsector grew by 4.6 percent over the year.

San Diego’s tourism industry continued its normal seasonal decline, losing 5,700 jobs from August to September. However, the industry added 3,700 jobs since September 2013, indicating that the industry is still performing well.

San Diego’s goods producers continued their steady employment growth, despite experiencing a seasonal drop like most industries in the region. Goods producers accounted for more than 27 percent of the annual job growth. The construction industry, despite losing 1,400 jobs last month, added 6,300 jobs from September 2013 to 2014, a 10.2 percent increase. Manufacturing was one of the few industries to grow this month, adding 600 jobs from August to September. This industry has added 2,500 jobs since September 2013,

Other substantial annual growth industries include ship and boat building, which grew by more than 11 percent and is a critical component of our maritime cluster. San Diego’s movers of goods have also been growing rapidly, as transportation and warehousing employment grew 7.5 percent over the year.

[Growth Chart]

While the apparent seasonal effects in this month’s report may grab the headlines, San Diego is performing well so far in 2014. San Diego’s key driving industries have had an outstanding year, at least in terms of job growth, and the region has continued to add middle-to-high paying jobs in industries like manufacturing, construction and PST services. San Diego continued to out-pace the U.S. in job growth, while seeing a healthy decline in the unemployment rate. With one quarter remaining, San Diego’s labor market has exceeded many expectations.

Note: Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how our unemployment rate compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

September 19, 2014

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This post is part of an ongoing monthly series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release and is brought to you by Manpower. Click images to enlarge in a new tab/window.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • As predicted, August marked the rebound from the seasonal effects experienced in the previous two months.
  • At 6.2 percent, San Diego’s unemployment rate fell in August by 0.7 percentage points from July. In addition, unemployment was down 1.5 points from August 2013.
  • San Diego’s unemployment rate was lower than the California average, and returned below the U.S. average.
  • The region gained 3,500 jobs from July to August, and added 34,200 jobs since last year.
  • A booming construction industry added 6,800 jobs since August 2013, a more than 10.8 percent increase over the year.
  • The manufacturing industry added 2,200 jobs since the previous August.
  • Staffing services grew by more than 2.5 percent since last year, indicating demand for hiring services.
  • San Diego’s traded economies continued to drive much of the monthly and annual employment growth.

[Unemployment Chart]

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the August 2014 period. At 6.2 percent San Diego County’s unemployment rate dropped 0.7 points from July to August, and fell by 1.5 points from this time last year. The unemployment rate in the region remained lower than California’s average, and returned to below the U.S. average of 6.3. As predicted in previous monthly reports, August began the seasonal decline of the unemployment rate. However, unlike the U.S. jobs report released earlier this month, August’s decline in San Diego was not driven by a lower labor force. In fact, San Diego’s labor force increased by 5,500 from July to August, as 6,600 less people registered as unemployed.

[Employment Chart]

When looking at employment growth, we’ve continued to see positive signs of steady growth, particularly in San Diego’s private sector. From July to August, the region added 3,500 jobs, more than 82 percent of which came from the private sector. The private sector added 2,900 jobs from July to August, a sign of continued economic growth. When looking at overall growth since last August, the region’s economy added 34,200 jobs, a 2.6 percent increase. Meanwhile, the region’s private sector grew by more than 3 percent over that period. With unemployment down and the economy consistently adding jobs, it appears as though many job seekers are finding landing spots as the economy continues to improve, and much of the growth is in middle-to-high paying industries.

[Growth Chart]

San Diego’s traded economies continued to drive much of the region’s employment growth. Professional, scientific and technical services (PST), heavily associated with innovation, added 1,600 jobs since July 2014, which accounted for more than half of private sector job growth since July. PST added 7,800 jobs since August 2013, for an annual growth rate of an impressive 6.2 percent, well above the economy-wide average of 2.6 percent. PST includes subsectors like scientific research and development, which is a key driver of our life sciences. This subsector grew by more than 4.2 percent over the year.

San Diego’s tourism industry began its seasonal decline, losing 2,700 jobs from July to August. However, the industry added 3,600 jobs since August 2013, indicating that the industry is still performing well. Health care and social services was another major contributor, adding 5,700 jobs since August 2013. Combined, PST, Tourism and Health Care accounted for more than half of the region’s annual private employment growth.

San Diego’s goods producing industries continued their steady employment growth. Manufacturing remained flat from July to August, but added a total of 2,200 jobs since August 2013. Meanwhile, the construction industry continued to boom. The industry added 500 jobs from July to August and 6,800 jobs since August 2013, for an astounding 10.9 percent annual growth rate. Combined, the manufacturing and construction industries accounted for more than one quarter of private employment growth from 2013 to 2014.

[Construction Chart]

The August employment report confirmed that much of the negativity that we saw in June and July were simply seasonal effects and not indicative of any negative trend. The recession is clearly in the rear-view mirror and has been for some time. May 2011 was the last month in which San Diego didn’t record a year-over-year job gain. We haven’t even experienced a month-to-month loss in private employment in 2014, an indication of how steadily the economy has been growing so far this year. Finally, the unemployment rate declined as a result of job-seekers finding employment, not job-seekers leaving the labor force, an important sign of a healthy regional economy.

Note: Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how our unemployment rate compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

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August 15, 2014

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This post is part of an ongoing monthly series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release and is brought to you by Manpower. Click images to enlarge in a new tab/window.

[Unemployment Chart]

HIGHLIGHTS

  • July is a historically misleading month, as state and local public education employees are subject to seasonal layoffs.
  • At 6.6 percent, San Diego’s unemployment rate went up again in July, this time by 0.5 percentage points from June. However, unemployment was down 1.4 points from July 2013.
  • San Diego’s unemployment rate was lower than the California average, but climbed slightly above the U.S. average.
  • The region lost 5,900 jobs from June to July, but added 37,200 jobs from the previous year, the highest year over year job growth recorded in 2014.
  • Construction industry employment in July was up more than 11.3 percent from the previous year.
  • The manufacturing industry added 2,200 jobs since the previous July.
  • Staffing services grew by more than 3.3 percent since last year, more than any other professional or business service subsector.
  • Tourism, innovation, construction and healthcare sectors continued to drive much of the monthly and annual employment growth.

[Unemployment Chart]

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the July 2014 period. San Diego County's unemployment rate went up from June to July, but fell by 1.4 points from this time last year. The unemployment rate in the region remained lower than California's average, but is now barely higher than the U.S. average (0.1 points higher). As stated in last month's report, a summer rise in the unemployment rate is common, as many students and other seasonal workers begin looking for summer employment, but struggle to find employment, driving up the labor force. The labor force increased by 14,800 from June to July, more than one-third of which found employment. The other two-thirds entered the unemployed category during a season when thousands of state and local educators, among other seasonal employees, are temporarily out of work. While there's no certainty in the future, history tells us to expect the unemployment rate to decline steadily from here on out through the end of the year.

[Employment Chart]

When looking at employment growth, we continue to see positive signs of steady growth, despite a misleading seasonal decline. From June to July, the region lost 5,900 jobs. On the surface, this seems negative until you consider that state and local public education contributed 12,800 lost jobs to the region as a result of seasonal layoffs. The private sector actually added 6,800 jobs, a sign of continued economic growth. When looking at overall growth since last July, the region’s economy added 37,200 jobs, a 2.8 percent increase and the largest annual growth recorded in 2014. Meanwhile, the region’s private sector grew by more than 3.1 percent over that period. Over the same period, San Diego experienced a 1.4 percentage point drop in the unemployment rate and a 17 percent drop in people who identified as unemployed, even with a slight increase in labor force participation.

[PST Chart]

San Diego’s traded economies drove much of the region’s employment growth. Professional, scientific and technical services (PST), heavily associated with innovation, added 2,200 jobs since June 2014 and 6,700 jobs since July 2013, for an annual growth rate of 5.4 percent, well above the economy-wide average. PST includes subsectors like scientific research and development, which grew by more than three percent over the year. PST accounted for nearly one-third of the private employment growth from June to July. San Diego’s tourism industry accounted for more than 39 percent of the region’s private employment growth from June to July, adding 2,700 jobs. In addition, the industry added 6,000 jobs since July 2013. Most of the growth is driven by food service businesses, but arts and recreation businesses also grew by six percent since last year. Health care and social services was another major contributor, adding 6,000 jobs since last July.

San Diego’s goods producing industries continued their steady employment growth. Manufacturing added another 200 employees from June to July, for a total of 2,200 jobs added since July 2013. Meanwhile, the construction industry continues to soar, and not just because of summer seasonal growth. The industry added 1,500 jobs from June to July and 7,000 jobs since July 2013, both of which represent more than 20 percent of private employment growth over those periods. 

[MFG Chart]

When going beyond the basic headlines of job loss and unemployment growth, the July employment report was actually full of good signs for San Diego’s economy. Our private sector economy continued to grow at a steady pace of more than three percent year-over-year. Goods-producing industries like construction and manufacturing continued to add jobs, and our innovation sectors grew well above the normal economic pace. While higher unemployment and overall job loss is concerning, it is very clear that these are simply seasonal trends related mostly to annual public education layoffs.

Note: Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how our unemployment rate compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

July 18, 2014

[Banner]

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This post is part of an ongoing monthly series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release and is brought to you by Manpower. Click images to enlarge in a new tab/window.

[Quote]

HIGHLIGHTS

  • At 6.1 percent, San Diego’s June unemployment rate went up 0.3 percentage points from May, but down 1.7 points from June 2013.
  • San Diego’s unemployment rate was lower than the U.S. and California averages.
  • The region added 9,700 jobs from May to June, and 34,600 jobs from the previous year.
  • Construction industry employment in June was up more than 8.4 percent from the previous year.
  • The manufacturing industry added 2,400 jobs since the previous June.
  • Tourism and Innovation sectors continued to drive much of the monthly and annual employment growth.

[Unemployment Chart]

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the June 2014 period. San Diego’s unemployment rate went up from May to June, but remained lower than California and U.S. averages. Historically, a rise in the unemployment rate is common in June, as many students and other seasonal workers begin looking for summer employment, thus driving up the labor force. The labor force increased by 3,200 from May to June. Meanwhile, total unemployment increased by 3,900, presumably comprised mostly of those entering the labor force. This trend is expected to continue throughout the summer, but is typical both historically and across the country.

[Employment Chart]

When looking at employment growth, we continue to see positive signs of steady growth. From May to June, the region added 9,700 jobs, more than 90 percent of which came from the private sector. When looking at growth since last June, the region’s economy added 34,600 jobs, a 2.6 percent increase. Meanwhile, the region’s private sector grew by more than three percent over that period. Over the same period, San Diego experienced a 1.7 percentage point drop in the unemployment rate and a 19 percent drop in people who identified as unemployed (after adjusting for lower labor force participation).

San Diego’s innovation sectors drove much of the region’s employment growth. Professional, scientific and technical services (PST) added 1,400 jobs since May 2014 and 6,800 jobs since June 2013, for an annual growth rate of 5.5 percent, well above the economy-wide average. PST accounted for more than 20 percent of the annual private employment growth—more than any other sector. The region’s maritime industry also experienced significant growth, with the ship and boat building sector growing 6.8 percent over the year.

[PST Chart]

San Diego’s tourism industry accounted for more than 34 percent of the region’s private employment growth from May to June, adding 3,000 jobs. In addition, the industry added 5,700 jobs since June 2013, with most of that growth coming from the food service industry. Health care and social services was another major contributor. The sector added 1,100 jobs since May and 5,700 jobs since last year.

San Diego’s goods producing industries continued their steady employment growth. Manufacturing employment has been rocky, but steadily grew year-over-year for more than five years. From June 2013 to June 2014, the industry added 2,400 jobs for about a 2.5 percent growth rate. Since June 2010, the industry has added more than 3,600 jobs. Meanwhile, the construction industry continues to soar. From June 2013 to June 2014, the industry added 5,200 jobs, about 8.5 percent growth. 

[MFG Chart]

While again this month’s job growth was led by only a few sectors, it’s important to note that most key industries have grown steadily from the previous year. Additionally, the sectors that drove the employment growth this month are either from our traded economies or are middle-to-high wage jobs in the region. For instance, employees in the PST industry make on average more than $100,000 per year. Manufacturing employees make more than $75,000 per year, more than 40 percent above the region’s average annual wage. High wage jobs help support other sectors in the economy by circulating more dollars throughout the economy. Therefore, consistent growth in these sectors is important for the economy as a whole.

Note: Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how our unemployment rate compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

June 20, 2014

This post is part of an ongoing monthly blog series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release. Click images to enlarge in a new tab/window.

[Unemployment Chart]

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the May 2014 period. San Diego's unemployment rate continued to decline from April to May, with the rate now down to 5.8 percent, the lowest it has been since May 2008. Unlike the major decline in April (read the full report here), the decline in May came without a drop in the region's labor force. From April to May, 3,000 joined San Diego's labor force, while the region experience a 3,800 person drop in civilian unemployment. Where last month's unemployment rate free fall was somewhat alarming, this month's decline appears to be a good sign for the economy. The region's unemployment rate is now below the national rate and remains well below the California rate.

The region added 5,100 jobs from April to May, 4,800 of which were in the private sector, which is another healthy sign for steady economic growth. Potentially more noteworthy, the region's economy added 29,300 jobs from May 2013 to May 2014, a 2.2 percent increase. The region's private sector grew by 2.5 percent from May 2013 to May 2014, a number roughly in the middle of expectations of the region's leading economists. As of May 2014, the region had 1,342,700 non-farm jobs, more than 82 percent of which were in the private sector.

[Construction Chart]

San Diego's goods producing industries continued their steady employment growth. Construction was up more than 1.5 percent from April to May, adding 1,000 jobs to the region. From May 2013 to May 2014, the construction industry has added 5,100 jobs, an 8.5 percent increase. Manufacturing growth has been a bit slower, but still steadily increasing, which is a great sign for the industry. From April to May, the manufacturing industry added 100 jobs. The industry added 1,700 jobs from May 2013 to May 2014.

As the region ramps up for summer tourism and convention season, the leisure and hospitality industry led most of the growth from April to May, adding 3,900 jobs to the economy, as expected. The industry was also up 3.7 percent from May 2013. Most of this month's growth came from the region's food services and drinking places. Health care and social assistance was the only other significant job creating industry from April to May, adding 1,000 jobs over the month period. 

[PST Chart]

The professional, scientific and technical services sector dropped by 700 jobs from April to May, but these monthly ebbs and flows are common in the industry, and we expect the industry to grow in the near future. From May 2013 to May 2014, the sector added 5,800 jobs, a 4.7 percent increase, which is among the highest growth sectors in San Diego over that period. Other significant growth sectors over the annual period include scientific research and development services sector and the region's retail and wholesale trade sectors. The former added 1,400 jobs while the latter combined to add 3,500 jobs.

While this month's job growth was led by only a few sectors, it's important to note that most key industries have grown steadily from the previous year. Additionally, the sectors that drove the employment growth this month are either from our traded economies, like tourism, or are leading indicators for strong economic growth, like construction and manufacturing. It is also positive to see the region's unemployment rate continue to fall while adding people to the labor force.

Note: Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how our unemployment rate compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

May 16, 2014

This post is part of an ongoing monthly blog series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release.

2014_04_Unemployment

The California Employment Development Department (EDD) released statewide county employment data today for the April 2014 period. The big headline in this month’s report is that San Diego County's unemployment rate has dropped nearly a full percentage point, down to 6.0 percent from 6.9 percent in March 2014 and 7.2 percent in April 2013. While this number appears encouraging, it is also noteworthy that the labor force lost 25,000 workers. This is the single largest month-to-month drop in the labor force on record (since 2000), and the lowest the labor force has been since October 2011. Meanwhile, the economy added 2,900 nonfarm jobs from March to April, which makes this month's report particularly perplexing. 

There are several possible explanations for this drastic decline in the labor force. First and most commonly, many long-term unemployed have simply given up looking for work or found work outside of the San Diego region. This most likely explains the 16,000 unemployed who exited the labor force. There may also have been less people who decided to enter the labor force, possibly out of lack of confidence in employment opportunities or lack of relevant skills. However, we also saw 9,000 employed persons leave the labor force, presumably because of a combination of retirements, seasonal exits and moves to other regions. It is not uncommon to see the labor force seasonally decline from March to April, just not to this magnitude. 

2014_04_LF

It appears contradictory that despite this massive labor force decline, the economy actually added jobs. It is worth noting that from February to March, the economy added 12,400 jobs while the labor force lost 11,200 workers. This is likely due to a discrepancy in the surveying, since labor force numbers come from household surveys and job numbers come from surveys of businesses. It is also possible that those who were employed found second jobs. The result is likely a mix of all of these factors, which leaves us with an unusual report for April.

As noted, the economy added 2,900 jobs total from March to April 2014. The private sector outperformed by adding 3,400 jobs in the month, with government job decline accounting for the 500 less jobs. Service providing industries added most of the jobs, while we saw job losses from the goods producing industries like construction and manufacturing.

2014_04_Total

The job picture looks even more promising when compared to last year. From April 2013 to April 2014, the economy added 29,000 jobs, a 2.2 percent increase. The private sector added 26,600 jobs over the year and we saw positive growth in the manufacturing and construction industries, which added 1,100 and 4,300 jobs, respectively. The 4,300 construction jobs added constitutes a 7.2 percent increase over the year. We also saw growth in our important traded economies, with leisure and hospitality adding 4,300 jobs and professional, scientific and technical services adding 6,200 jobs.

We will likely need to wait until future job reports to determine if this unusual report is an anomaly or an indication of larger trends. Historically, we have seen the labor force continue to decline or remain relatively flat from April to May, but with the recent major change in labor force amidst job creation, we may see people coming back to the labor force in the coming months.

Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how this compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

April 22, 2014

This is the inaugural post of an ongoing monthly blog series dedicated to the California Employment Development Department (EDD) monthly employment release.

2014_03_Total

The California Employment Development Department (EDD)released statewide county employment data on Friday for the March 2014 period. The biggest news coming out of this month’s report is that San Diego County has finally exceeded its historical seasonally unadjusted employment peak set in December 2007. EDD reported that the region now has 1,335,200 non-farm jobs as of March 2014, exceeding the previous peak of 1,333,400 jobs. Economists expected employment to rebound above its pre-recession peak sometime in 2014, and it is encouraging to exceed that mark as early as March.

Private employment, which was reported at 1,100,300 jobs, has yet to exceed its peak of 1,110,100 set in August 2007. However, March 2014 private employment was the second highest ever recorded. The region added 30,100 private industry jobs from March 2013 to March 2014, with 10,600 of those jobs being added from February to March 2014.

2014_03_MFG_CONST

San Diego’s construction and manufacturing industries continue to pick up steam as the economy rebounds from the recession. The construction industry added 2,000 jobs from February to March 2014, and added 5,800 jobs from March 2013 to March 2014. While manufacturing growth was more modest, the industry added 500 jobs from February to March and added 1,200 jobs from the previous year.

Professional and business services added 6,500 jobs from March 2013 to March 2014, the most of any industry in the region. Professional and business services includes much of the innovation economy activity, along with critical service providers like legal services, architecture services and enterprise management. It is also the largest industry in San Diego, employing more than 228,000 as of March 2014. San Diego’s leisure and hospitality industry, otherwise known as tourism, added 6,100 jobs from March 2013 to March 2014, with 3,400 of those jobs added from February to March 2014. Both of these industries had already exceeded their pre-recession peaks in 2013.

2014_03_Unemployment

The county’s seasonally unadjusted unemployment rate dropped to 6.9 percent in March 2014, down from 7.0 percent in February 2014 and 7.8 percent in March 2013. California’s statewide unemployment rate was 8.4 percent in March 2014, well above San Diego’s posted rate. Our Economic Indicators Dashboard will show how this compares to other US metros and the US total rate when that information is released in the coming weeks.

April 21, 2014

When MIT set out to the name the world’s smartest company in February, they didn’t look to count the number of patents or PHds or even stock gains; instead, they asked themselves whether a company had made strides which have helped redefine its field. The answer was not a company located in Silicon Valley or Seoul or London. The answer was – and still is – right here in San Diego. That company is Illumina.

Founded in 1998, Illumina has not only helped build the genomics field, but also has redefined it. In a time when medicine and medical research are becoming increasingly expensive, Illumina has made personalized medicine more attainable. They have made it feasible to sequence genomes for under $1,000 a patient.

Last week, more than 15 EDC stakeholders got to experience this innovation first hand when they toured Illumina’s UTC headquarters. With its wide array of platforms, Illumina is sought out by researchers and healthcare professionals as well as ancestry companies, such as Ancestry.com and 23 & Me to provide valuable genetic information. Each day, Illumina and its 3,000 global employees- 1,500 in San Diego - work to improve lives around the world by unlocking the power of the genome.

On the tour of Illumina’s campus, guides walked participants through R&D space, on-site manufacturing facilities and a suite of amenities available to Illumina’s employees, including a state-of-the-art fitness center, coffee shops, an amphitheater and the cafeteria, which employees admit is the most effective and efficient meeting space on campus. Collaboration is at Illumina’s core and all of these spaces provide opportunities for employees to exchange information and generate new ideas, developing the next ideas that will fuel Illumina’s growth as a global brand.

As MIT notes when talking about their rankings, “It might sound difficult to define what makes a smart company, but you know one when you see it.” Thanks in part to Illumina, San Diego is showing the rest of the world what smart really means.


March 13, 2014

It’s EDC’s job to be a booster of all-things San Diego. Through our work, we get the opportunity to meet budding entrepreneurs and small businesses owners.  They differ in the types of enterprises they run and in the people they hire, but they all say one thing: San Diego is a great place to launch a startup or small business.  We know that San Diego has many ingredients for entrepreneurs to be successful -- from a top tier talent pool to diverse neighborhoods which help attract the right people -- but we haven’t had a definitive ranking that said it all. Now we do: Today, Forbes ranked San Diego “The Best Place to Launch a Startup in 2014.”

San Diego is the best place to launch a startup in 2014. We’ll give that a moment to sink in.

One of the criteria used to rank location is based on social media use of small businesses in the selected city. As the article writes, “It turns out that Internet-savvy businesses are likely to grow faster than those that don’t…. Web presence indicates adaptability and likelihood to innovate—creating a network effect for communities dedicated to growth and positive change.” There’s no doubt that San Diego has its share of social media-savvy entrepreneurs and small business owners.  Recognizing this, EDC has recently brought together a group of these “Digital Ambassadors” to help carry positive messages about the region to the rest of the world. We’re constantly amazed about the powerful things we learn about San Diego through social media every day.  Just yesterday, we learned that Google Analytics got its start in San Diego as Urchin.

Here’s a little more about what Forbes had to say about the region:

"Small enterprises ranked in the top five on nearly every category to lift San Diego into the top slot. There is heavy concentration in projected high growth industries, as well as a high likelihood of accepting credit cards and adopting social media. San Diego is home to the fifth-best rated business community in the country. “

Although we have often been known to criticize the methodology of “rankings,” we need to celebrate where we can. And today, we celebrate!  San Diego Is, in fact, the best place to launch a startup in 2014.

Now, let’s continue to use our award-winning social media skills to get the word out.


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