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Mega-Region

March 25, 2015

With California Aerospace week underway in Sacramento, we wanted to take a look at how San Diego contributes to this thriving cluster. The industry counts itself among the  “aerospace, navigation and maritime technologies cluster,” which directly employs 35,000 in the region at an average annual wage of nearly $84,000. In an effort to bolster job creation in the industry, LAEDC and San Diego Regional EDC were in Sacramento earlier this week to meet the new chairs of the Assembly and Senate select committees on aerospace.

Aerospace has a long history in San Diego, dating back to the early 1900s when Ryan Airlines built the Spirit of St. Louis and Reuben Fleet brought Consolidated Aircraft Corporation to Lindbergh Field. Since then, San Diego’s aerospace cluster has been an integral part of the region’s innovation and defense economies.

Here are a few things you may not have known about the region’s thriving aerospace industry:

  1. They're not all "manned."
    Illustrating some of the dynamic uses for unmanned system.
    Illustrating some of the dynamic uses of unmanned systems. Clockwise from top left: Drone used for newspaper delivery (The Atlantic), prepping a wildfire- fighting drone for launch (The New York Times), simulation of a lifeguard/lifesaving drone (AUVSI), agricultural drone used for pest control.( Diydrones.com)
    Pilot-less aircraft, or unmanned air systems/drones, are revolutionizing the world. From the drone hobbyist to military contractors, San Diego’s diverse terrain, military expertise, and talented workforce have put us at the epicenter of drone manufacturing.

    Like many great innovations (e.g.  the internet), drone technology originated in the military, but has broad applications. From fighting wildfires to crop dusting and delivering crucial medications to people in disaster-inflicted areas, drones are another example of how San Diego works to solve some of the world’s hardest problems.

    A 2013 study by AUVSI found UAS integration in California would create 18,161 jobs throughout the state within a decade of airspace incorporation.

  2. The largest aerospace manufacturer in the state has a presence here.
    Nat Geo host Andrew Evans explores Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk during filming of the documentary
    Nat Geo documentary host Andrew Evans explores Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk during filming of the documentary.
    Defense Innovator Northrop Grumman – the Golden State’s largest defense company -  has 3,087 employees in San Diego, according to the SDBJ. Recognizing the region’s strengths in UAS technology, the company consolidated its Unmanned Center of Excellence to its Rancho Bernardo location in 2013.

    Northrop Grumman is featured in the upcoming Nat Geo “Smart Cities” documentary about San Diego (stay tuned for air dates).
     
  3. Baja California contributes to the region’s aerospace dominance.
    Calibaja Manufacturing
    A manufacturing facility in Baja California.
    As Mayor Faulconer likes to say regarding the San Diego – Tijuana relationship, “We’re two cities, but we’re one Mega-region.” This is particularly true when you look at the aerospace sector. Despite a recent decline, Baja California’s stronghold in aerospace manufacturing still reigns supreme, boasting more jobs in that sector than any other Mexican state.
     
  4. We’re getting ready to release the largest economic impact study about the aerospace industry the region has ever seen.
    Members from San Diego Regional EDC and LAEDC gather with legislaters in Sacremento to show support for the state's aerospace industry
    San Diego Regional EDC and LAEDC gather with legislators in Sacramento to show support for the state's aerospace industry.
    San Diego Regional EDC is working collaboratively with LAEDC to launch an aerospace economic impact study that will quantify the nine counties that make up Southern California. The study will help articulate how Southern California’s aerospace industry competes on a global level.
     

October 8, 2014

On the first Friday of every October, manufacturers across the country open their doors to the public to celebrate National Manufacturing Day (MFG Day). Last Friday, San Diego had 28 companies – more than any other region in California – participate in the day’s activities. Companies representing San Diego and Northern Baja’s diverse industries from biotech to aerospace, UAV and beer, united to show San Diegans all that’s made right here in our backyard.

In case you missed the morning’s panel and tours, we’ve compiled a list of things we’ve learned about these San Diego makers.

  1. Science and beer can share a roof
    Beer is science. If there is any company that demonstrates this, it’s San Diego-based White Labs, which was one of the innovators that opened its doors to the public this MFGDay. Part laboratory, part brewery, they are participating in another innovation activity San Diego knows well: decoding the genome; except instead of looking at the human genome, they’re looking to unravel beer’s DNA.
  2. Northern Baja is the gold standard of manufacturing
    CareFusion is one company that’s using the mega-region to its advantage. As a medical device manufacturer, they have acquired companies all over the U.S. However, all of its U.S. manufacturing facilities pale in comparison to its facilities right across the border, in Tijuana and Mexicali, said Carlos Nunez, chief medical officer of CareFusion, at a kickoff panel hosted by EDC on the morning of MFG Day. Many other innovators throughout San Diego have pointed to access to Mexico as a reason to set up shop in the region.

    On Sunday, CareFusion announced they were being acquired by Becton, Dickinson & Co (BD), a New Jersey-based medical technology company. The acquisition is further evidence of San Diego’s ability to develop sought-after, innovative companies. BD is committed to maintaining an active presence in San Diego, which we can speculate may be due to the mega-region’s strong R&D and manufacturing capabilities.
     
  3. East County is where music is made
    Two of the world’s most renowned musical instrument companies call East County home. Taylor Guitars, which has won the affection of musical talents including San Diego’s homegrown Jason Mraz, is located in El Cajon. This year marks the company’s 40th Anniversary. On MFG Day, tour goers were treated to a behind-the-scenes look at the company that employs more than 400 people in the region.

    The largest banjo manufacturer in the U.S. is headquartered in Spring Valley. Deering – The Great American Banjo Company, was another company San Diegans were invited to tour on MFG Day.
  4. San Diego flies above the rest in UAVs
    In May, San Diego was one of the first 12 communities in the U.S. selected to participate in the Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership, which allows the region to compete for a pool of $1.3 billion to support the local manufacturing industry. The region was selected specifically for its expertise in aerospace manufacturing.

    On Friday, two very different aerospace manufacturers – Northrop Grumman and 3D Robotics - invited people to their respective locations to check out their innovations first had. Both of these companies have made a name for themselves for their work in the unmanned aerial vehicles field.
    In Rancho Bernardo, Northrop Grumman treated tour goers to a peak at its Unmanned Systems Center of Excellence, where spectators got to meet a very impressive 21-year-old engineer.

    In Otay Mesa, 3D Robotics showed off its indoor testing facility. The UAVs are assembled right across the border in Tijuana. At Friday’s panel, Guillermo Romero, a director with the company, spoke about the collaboration between his facilities on both sides of the border. His team can design a world-class UAV in San Diego, and manufacturer in Mexicali the same day.
     
  5. Manufacturers are hiring…and they pay well
    Manufacturing provides strong middle-class jobs to many San Diegans. With more than 2,900 companies in the manufacturing ranks, the industry represents about 8.7 percent of all jobs in San Diego, yet it accounts for 12.2 percent of all wages.

    One company that is looking to ramp up hiring is General Dynamics NASSCO. The shipyard is looking to bring on 1,000 new employees for jobs including welding and shipfitting. As Kevin Graney, vice president and general manager of the shipbuilder said at Friday’s panel, “If you can weld, come see me after.” The Barrio Logan company is committed to helping fill those jobs through apprenticeships and skills training.

    Community colleges, apprenticeships and other job training programs are vital assets as San Diego companies look to fill these vacant positions. As panelist Dave Klimkiewicz of the iconic Sector 9 skateboards said, “Not everyone needs to go to college, but everyone needs to live.” He talked about the need to bring back hands-on classes at the middle and high school level. Panelist Bob Cassidy of ViaSat also discussed the need to fill the workforce pipeline with more highly-skilled manufacturing technicians. 

August 14, 2014

Pharma MFG info

Selected by the US Secretary of Commerce as one of the 12 advanced manufacturing communities in the country, San Diego is on the forefront of helping to strengthen American manufacturing. Manufacturing supports more than 90,000 jobs throughout San Diego County. National Manufacturing Day on October 3 provides San Diego and Northern Baja manufacturers an opportunity to highlight to the local community and the country, the diverse products that are manufactured in our region.

So why should San Diego County care about manufacturing? Here are a few reasons:

  • San Diego County’s 2,909 manufacturers employ 94,445.
  • Manufacturing industry jobs pay on average $75,824 annually, compared to the average private employer at $53,778.
  • Manufacturing industry jobs pay about 41 percent more than the average private job.
  • The manufacturing industry represents about 8.7 percent of all jobs in San Diego and about 12.2 percent of all wages/pay.
  • The manufacturing industry contributes more than $7.1 billion in wages every year.

On Oct. 3, many San Diego and Northern Baja companies will open their doors to the public as part MFG Day, a national program that addresses common misperceptions about the manufacturing industry.  If you know a manufacturer in our region, encourage them to participate! Participants currently confirmed to host tours include: 3D Robotics, D&K Engineering and more. MFgday.com has the complete list.

Med-Device-mFGs

The tours will be preceded by a breakfast panel and discussion with leaders in the manufacturing industry at San Diego Central Public Library including California Manufacturers and Technology Association, 3D Robotics, CareFusion, General Dynamics NASSCO, Sector 9, and ViaSat. To register to attend, visit https://sandiegomfgday2014.eventbrite.com.

We hope to see you at Manufacturing Day, but if we don’t catch you there, you can still follow the conversation on twitter using the hashtag #MadeinSD. 

Manufacturing day is presented by San Diego City College CACT Program with additional sponsorship provided by D&K Engineering, Chase, Manpower, National University

Thank you to our media partner, San Diego Business Journal. 

#MadeinSD

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April 11, 2014
Every quarter, San Diego Regional EDC analyzes key economic metrics that are important to understanding the regional economy and San Diego’s standing relative to other major metropolitan areas in the U.S. This issue covers data from the October 2013 to January 2014 quarter. 
 
In this issue, EDC presents updates on trends in employment, real estate and venture capital, with a special spotlight on the cybersecurity industry in San Diego. The spotlight revealed details of a recent San Diego industry study on the subject, including employment trends and company reactions. 
 
Industry Highlights
 
  • San Diego County’s January 2014 unemployment rate was down 1.6 percentage points from January 2013. 
  • The San Diego region added 25,900 jobs from January 2013 to January 2014. 
  • San Diego had the third lowest foreclosure rate among recorded major U.S. metropolitan areas in January 2014. 
  • Led by the manufacturing industry, industrial tenants absorbed 2.3 million square feet in 2013. 
  • San Diego firms were involved in 23 venture capital deals in Q4 2013 and received more than $145 million in venture capital funding. 
 
Download the complete snapshot
 
 
Brought to you by: Chase Logo
 

Visit our Research Dashboard

April 10, 2014

Brookings Panel in Seattle

 

San Diego is one of only six cities selected to participate in a new pilot program to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) to the region as part of the Global Cities Initiative, a joint project of the renowned Brookings Institution and JPMorgan Chase.

San Diego joined Columbus, Minneapolis, Portland, San Antonio and Seattle in Seattle today to participate in the first working session, where leadership will collaborate with other regions to address the region’s foreign direct investment plan. San Diego’s team is made up of representatives from the City of San Diego, UC San Diego, JPMorgan Chase, Biocom, Qualcomm, GO-Biz and San Diego Regional EDC.

Foreign direct investment has long supported regional economies, not only by infusing capital, but also by investing in workers, strengthening global connections and sharing best business practices. As the world’s largest economy with a stable investment environment, the United States has been a top destination for foreign direct investment and San Diego is looking to ensure it pulls in a significant portion of this FDI.

In San Diego, many small and medium-sized enterprises have pushed their attention towards the issue of capital. As venture capitalists around the U.S. become more selective about companies they invest in, we must look for alternative solutions. FDI is one answer. Although FDI sounds like an elusive term, this means more capital flow to the region as well as more international attention paid to San Diego which has a strong economic payoff.   

Sean Barr, vice president of economic development at EDC, sat on panel today moderated by Amy Liu, senior fellow at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, which discussed establishing a region’s global identity. According to Brookings, “the most globally fluent metro areas demonstrate a combination of an appealing identity, high standards and reputation, and global relevance in specific markets.”

San Diego has many strengths, and one of our admitted struggles is that it’s difficult to form a distinct global identity when we have so many industries of which to be proud. We are home to a thriving biotech sector where companies like Illumina - dubbed the “World’s Smartest Company” - are based. We have a strong defense sector that is second to none. From our telecom industry to our sports innovation and algae biofuels cluster, the region is an innovation hub. One thing that Sean stressed during the panel is that although San Diego loves its sun, we need to be comfortable shedding our strict tourism message and moving beyond “sun and Shamu.” Working with the Brookings Institute to increase San Diego’s share of FDI is one way to do this.

As part of the pilot, San Diego will develop a foreign direct investment market assessment and plan, along with an implementation plan and a policy memo. This work, added to the region’s existing export plan, forms the second core component of a global engagement strategy that will strengthen the region's global economic connections and competitiveness.

San Diego is the only city in California selected for this pilot program and is one of only two cities in the program for which Brookings will be developing and publishing the complete FDI plan.

Here’s what some people are saying about the announcement:

  • City of San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer said: “San Diego’s strong ties to international markets, high-growth industries and culture of innovation mean we have the necessary ingredients to attract foreign direct investment to the region. I am honored Brookings selected San Diego for this pilot program and I look forward to working with the core team  to show that San Diego is open for business.”
     
  • Councilman Mark Kersey, fifth district, City of San Diego said: “San Diego is becoming start-up central and small-medium enterprises will benefit from a regional strategy for attracting foreign direct investment. I’d like to see more companies born global, attracting international investment and competing in worldwide markets.”
     
  • William Bold, senior vice president of government affairs of Qualcomm said:  “The highly educated work force, technology clusters, and location of San Diego already make it a thriving hub of the globalized economy. The Global Cities Initiative will only strengthen San Diego’s attractiveness to foreign investors looking for a solid innovation and high-technology track record. We’re delighted to help with an effort to share with the rest of the world the trade, talent and financial potential to be found here.”
     
  • Brennon Crist, JPMorgan Chase market manager for Middle Market/Commercial Banking in San Diego said: “We’re delighted that  San Diego will be a part of this new pilot – it’s exactly the kind of innovative planning that will ensure our community’s long-term economic success. We have a history of helping businesses connect to global markets and the Global Cities Initiative’s foreign direct investment work brings another level of depth to our region’s efforts to further create jobs, attract capital and grow our economy.”
     
  • Brad McDearman, Brookings fellow and director of metro trade and investment said: “For this pilot, we selected metro areas that are committed to attracting and leveraging foreign direct investment as part of a comprehensive global trade and investment strategy. The six metro areas selected for this round will be strong role models for other regions and represent a growing group of leaders who understand the need to embrace the global market to remain competitive in the 21st century economy.”
     
  •  Joe Panetta, president and CEO of Biocom said: “The region’s global mindset is apparent when you look at the thriving life sciences industry. Companies have long looked to San Diego for its world-class talent pool and abundant research opportunities. San Diego’s new collaboration with Brookings not only means that the region has opportunities to create more jobs, but also that we will be looked at as a role model for other areas looking to embrace the global economy.”

 

 

November 11, 2013

Illustration of GroundMetrics oil producing technology

 

GroundMetrics CEO George Eiskamp recently demonstrated a talent important to any entrepreneur building a company – extemporaneous speaking. Asked to give a quick update on his company at the closing lunch of the World’s Best Technology conference (WBT), Eiskamp whisked the audience through his firm’s financing wins and in the process showed that it takes a proverbial village to get a company up and running.

Founded in 2010, GroundMetrics is developing a new class of sensor system for advanced ground-based electromagnetic survey and monitoring services for resource exploration, production and environmental integrity.

Eiskamp’s early funding set records with San Diego’s Tech Coast Angels. His first round of financing in 2012 was the largest investment ever raised from a single chapter ($1.2 million). A Small Business Innovation Research grant (SBIR) from the U.S. Department of Energy soon followed and in October of 2012 GroundMetrics was selected to present at WBT.

Eiskamp’s story was welcome news for the WBT class of 2013. Since participating in the program last year, where the company won a Gold award as one of the most promising technologies showcased at the event, GroundMetrics took second place in the San Diego Venture Group’s PitchFest, closed a second round of financing – again led by San Diego Tech Coast Angels – and secured an additional SBIR grant from the Department of Energy as well as a $1.8M grant not earmarked for small companies.  The company also added the world’s 6th largest and 20th largest oil companies to its customer base in addition to repeat business from the world’s largest oil company.

San Diego Regional EDC’s Matt Sanford (who met Eiskamp at WBT 2012) introduced him to Tom Van Betten and Kaley Severn at Cassidy Turley San Diego, who helped him locate office space in Kearny Mesa and referred him to James Morrell at Veteran Solutions to renovate the space. In a follow up email, Eiskamp was very positive about his experience. “I’d highly recommend them to other early stage companies, which are the real economic drivers in any community and especially tech clusters like San Diego.”

GroundMetrics is currently in due diligence for a Series B round of funding with two organizations he met via WBT in 2012. It was a meeting with one of those groups at the site of WBT 2013 that led to the last minute request for what turned out to be an inspiring story for companies currently in the hunt for funding.


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November 1, 2013

101 San Diego Companies made Inc 5000 list of fastest growing companies

Earlier this week, Inc. magazine released its annual Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing companies. More than 100 companies in San Diego metro made the list, including four EDC Investors: SKLZ,Sentek GlobalD&K Engineering and VAVi Sport and Social Club. Other prominent San Diego region businesses made the list, such as Stone Brewing and Quality Controlled Manufacturing, who recently participated in San Diego Manufacturing Day with EDC and other regional partners. 

The Inc. 5000 list ranks companies by revenue growth from 2009 through 2012 for companies that are U.S.-based, privately-held, for profit, and independent with 2012 revenues greater than $2 million. The 101 San Diego companies on the list totaled more than $1.75 billion in annual revenue in 2012. Among all US metros, San Diego had the 13th most companies on the list. 

This list shows San Diego's businesses are gaining steam. While we're home to one percent of the nation's privately-held businesses, San Diego companies make up 2 percent of this year's Inc 5000  list.

Click here to see the full Inc. 5000 list. Click here to see the full list of San Diego metro businesses.

October 31, 2013

NACIC 2013 panel image

Earlier this week the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce and The Mexico Business Center hosted the North American Competitiveness and Innovation Conference (NACIC). The conference focused on cross border trade and business opportunities between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. 
 
One of the most popular panels focused on developing workforce talent and was moderated by EDC’s CEO Mark Cafferty. The panelists were Bill Bold, sr. vice president of QUALCOMM, Lauren Friese, CEO and founder of TalentEgg from Ontario, Canada and Rafael Sostmann, professor of practice for education innovation and special advisor to the president of Arizona State University.
 
Mark opened the session by explaining that San Diego Regional EDC’s attraction efforts focus on corporate executives and talent, specifically young people just graduating from universities. He said competitiveness for North America is about talent and asked the panel: “How we develop the workforce of the future?”
 
Rafael, an engineer by training, is also the former president of Mexico’s largest private, nonprofit educational system, Tecnológico de Monterrey. He suggested that industry linkages with universities are critical. At ASU, student startups are supported through on campus incubators and on campus industrial parks leased to businesses.
 
Lauren explained that she started her company, an online tool that connects young talent with job opportunities, after she finished graduate school in London. She discovered that linkages between students and industries were much stronger in the United Kingdom than in Canada. Inspired by the tools she saw working in the UK, she replicated the networking platform through TalentEgg. She suggested that too often employers only want to hire young people with “the right” degree, when there are plenty of people who can be trained for just about any career. 
 
Bill spoke about the investments and partnerships QUALCOMM has with students and universities to grow its future workforce. As a world leader in mobile communications and computing technologies, QUALCOMM licenses its innovations to smart phone manufacturers. QUALCOMM is also the world’s largest producer or semiconductors. Of its 31,000 employees worldwide, 81 percent have a degree in a STEM field. The mobile giant is dependent on international markets; While 92 percent of the company's revenues are earned outside the U.S 67 percent of its workforce is in San Diego because they care about hiring locally. Bill said Qualcomm is intense about recruiting – pursuing only the top one percent of graduates from the top five percent of universities – likening it to college football recruiting. Last year Qualcomm had 1,100 paid interns, of whom 300 got offered full time jobs, and 250 accepted. The company recently invested $20 million in a new engineering center at Berkeley to build a cutting-edge program blending art, architecture and engineering. 
 
Responding to a question from the audience about the best ways to prepare young people for careers, the panel pointed to the German apprentice-style model. Germany’s vocational education system pairs classroom studies with on-the-job learning. Students apply for a specific apprenticeship at a company. For two to three years they spend a few days a week at a work site, getting paid a stipend from their employer, and one to two days a week in a classroom learning theory. They graduate with a certificate that signifies they know all the basics to begin working professionally in their fields. Not only are the certificates standardized throughout Germany,  but they are also well-respected and often a necessary requirement for jobs. Companies like Siemens have brought the work experience aspects of the program to the U.S. offering students here similar opportunities. 
 
If San Diego wants to maintain its share of talent, it would be in our best interest to explore similar programs. 
 
October 4, 2013

IMG_0781_cropped

 

Every San Diego company has a unique story to tell. That became very apparent as the region came together to celebrate MFG Day at San Diego City College on Friday. Four panelists representing a diversity of San Diego companies talked about the challenges and opportunities facing the region’s manufacturing sector, which employs more than 90,000 individuals.

Take D&K Engineering, a high-tech manufacturer.  When the entrepreneurs who created EcoATM were looking to make their idea a reality, they went to the Rancho Bernardo firm to create an e-recycling kiosk. As a result, D&K Engineering had to scale up its production and hire more employees. And they chose to do it in San Diego. “Access to talent and the border opportunities are one of the main reasons I chose to start D&K in San Diego. Besides, who wouldn’t want to live here?” said Alex Kunczynski, one of the company’s founders.

The border also adds a significant competitive advantage for local manufacturers. As Interim Mayor Todd Gloria said in his opening remarks, “this is a big deal.” San Diego and Tijuana are currently working together like never before. When asked about why Taylor Guitars chose to open up a manufacturing facility across the border in Tecate, VP of Manufacturing Chris Wellons said “We have a saying at Taylor Guitars. We say ‘We’ll we be happy we did this in 10 years.’” And happy they are. Manufacturing in Mexico, as opposed to China or somewhere else overseas, has given Taylor more control over its finished product. It’s also become more cost competitive.

Wellons alluded to the entrepreneurial spirit of another panelist. Stephan Aarstol started Tower Paddle Boards - a sports and active lifestyle company - in 2010. With a little help from ABC’s “Shark Tank,”he transformed his sales from $3,000 in 2010 to $3 million in 2013.  Although he only has four employees in San Diego, he plans on growing in the coming years, and he’s looking to do it in the region. To him, he’s not just selling a paddleboard but also exporting California culture to consumers all over the globe.

As Chris Wellons of Taylor Guitars echoed, keeping manufacturing jobs close to home really comes down to innovating the process. Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees, with many of them working out of its El Cajon headquarters. Although customers can still rely on the same quality that made Taylor a household name when it was founded in 1974, the manufacturing process has evolved. Taylor used to carve each of its guitar necks out of an individual piece of mahogany, meaning 60 – 70 percent of the materials were wasted. In 1999, Taylor decided that process needed to change. The result was one of the greatest guitar innovations in the past 100 years.  Instead of using a one-piece neck, Taylor switched to a three-piece neck, which resulted in a 66 percent yield in materials and created a more sustainable product. This, Wellons said, was possible because of the ability to execute a vision, which he thinks is a strength of San Diego.

So what can San Diego do to continue incubating manufacturing?

The answer may be easier said than done. San Diego is fortunate enough to have a highly-educated workforce. The metro currently ranks fourth in the U.S. for Ph.D. attainment rates.  Although Ph.D.-trained workers are essential for many San Diego sectors, as the panelists noted, it’s not necessarily these types of jobs they have trouble filling, but the machinist jobs where workers require hands-on manufacturing skills.

Wellons learned these skills in his high school shop class, and so did many other highly-skilled manufacturers. Admittedly, we focus a lot of time on retaining and incubating high-tech talent, but as Interim Mayor Gloria pointed out “These jobs are important too. They provide a comfortable middle-class life.” San Diego City College provided the perfect backdrop to get this conversation going. As San Diego Community College District Trustee Peter Zschiesche noted, 98 percent of San Diego City College grads remain in San Diego. 

With the guidance of San Diego Community College District and organizations like San Diego Workforce Partnership, San Diego – and it’s nearly 2,800 manufacturers – are looking to put these grads to work.

Of course, this all starts with the conversation we had this morning. A conversation that I’d bet we’ll be happy we had in 10 years.

Please check out MFGday.com for a list of local companies that held tours today,

Media Coverage: 

KPBS, Taylor Guitars still strumming along as example of San Diego manufacturing success

U-T, S.D. county product makers open doors to public

 

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August 27, 2013

On the border of San Diego and Tijuana sits San Ysidro, the busiest land port of entry in the world. Every day, an astounding 50,000 vehicles and 25,000 pedestrians wait in line to enter the U.S. One in eight people who cross into the country daily will do so via the San Ysidro Port of Entry. And that’s only one of California’s six ports of entry.

The border provides enormous economic opportunities for the region, but wait times are impeding our ability to harness this potential. Current infrastructure needs must be addressed. According to the San Diego Metropolitan Export Initiative: Market Assessment, San Ysidro is an “infrastructural bottleneck,” with many respondents citing difficulties with border crossing as a barrier to doing business in Mexico.  Even with the recent expansion of several border crossings, today’s average wait time sits at 70 minutes, translating into more than eight million trips lost due to congestion each year. In fact, more jobs are lost in San Diego every year to border congestion than the government’s recent budget sequestration.*

A new bill is trying to speed up border wait times. SB 397, sponsored by Sen. Ben Hueso (D- San Diego), calls for the creation of an Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL), which will permit carriers to use “Ready Lanes.” The technology in these new driver licenses, which will be issued by California’s DMV—eliminates the need to manually key –in travelers information, translating into a 60 percent faster processing time.

Several Canadian border states have successfully implemented EDLs and Arizona and Texas are working on instituting similar programs for our neighbors to the south.  

Although SB 397 is only a small part of a long string of reforms that are needed to expedite border crossing, it’s a step in the right direction. The San Diego region cannot afford to lose out on the $1.3 billion in revenue and $ 42 million in wages that dissipate due to border congestion every year. The border is one of the most unique aspects about the region. Companies including 3Drobotics and Aqualung don’t shy away from the fact that this is one of the reasons they are proud to call San Diego home. Through work with the CaliBaja Bi-National Mega-Region, EDC understands the fundamental necessity of teaming with Baja California, Mexico and Imperial County to the East.

Bottom line: the border means big business for the mega region. SB 397 is one step in helping us maximize our cross-border potential.

 

Sources:  AB 17, SB 397, SB 397 Fact Sheet

*Projected impact of sequestration was 10 percent of military personal across board in San Diego; Recent SDMAC report found that the military had  311,000 direct employees in the region, SDMAC Military Impact Report 2012

 


 

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