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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


Talent and Universities

October 14, 2015

 

Working to help create more opportunities for all San Diego residents and establish San Diego as an international city of innovation, Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer and the San Diego EDC opened doors at iboss Cybersecurity, one of the 500 fastest growing technology, media, telecommunications companies in North America.

Mayor Faulconer said, “Over the past several months, we have been cementing our reputation as a world-class leader in innovation. As mayor, I know that if San Diego is going to be a beacon of global innovation and opportunities, we need to support innovative companies like iboss to succeed. I want to make it easier for more world-class cyber security firms like iboss to call San Diego home.”

Paul Martini, CEO and Founder of iboss said, “We’re extremely excited to open our new global headquarters in San Diego which demonstrates how far we’ve come since we first launched here more than 10 years ago,” “San Diego is quickly becoming a hub for cybersecurity companies and that means the infrastructure and talent is in place to enable us to continue to grow here.”

Mark Cafferty, President and CEO of San Diego Regional EDC said, “While iboss has undoubtedly played a critical role in the world  of cybersecurity, it’s also been a great story for San Diego’s  innovation economy and global presence. iboss is showing that San Diego is a place where investors and companies can profoundly succeed in cybersecurity, technology and innovation.”

As a way of growing the region’s innovation economy, the City of San Diego’s development services division and economic development department worked in lock-step with iboss throughout its expansion, shepherding the company through the permitting process. The San Diego Regional EDC acted as liaison between the City of San Diego, the State of California and other entities to help the company through the process.  

Recently ranked by Deloitte Technology as one of the fastest-growing technology companies in North America, iboss Cybersecurity is heralded as the only company that can detect and contain large data breaches before loss occurs. iboss is also internationally recognized for its patented technology that automatically detects malicious data transfers before hackers can steal large amounts of sensitive information.

According to a 2015 economic impact study conducted by  EDC, iboss has a $59 million economic impact on the regional economy. With its new expansion, the company will directly employ approximately 270 workers. The company’s hires spur additional economic activity throughout the San Diego. In other words, for every ten jobs iboss creates in San Diego, an additional 13 new jobs are created in the region. Over the past three years, iboss has grown by more than 1800 percent and was named one of the fastest growing technology companies by Deloitte in 2014. The firm’s 4,000+ enterprise clients include Xerox, Sears and the U.S. Department of Interior.

iboss hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony for its new global headquarters in Sorrento Mesa. The 43,000 square-foot will house a new iboss threat research center, which identifies new malware and viruses that threaten computer networks. The iboss office builds on the company’s commitment to the San Diego community and highlights the growing cybersecurity industry in the region.  iboss is also partnering with the nearby University of California-San Diego Supercomputer Center to develop an internship program that will provide the company with a rich talent pool of qualified graduates.

 

October 1, 2015

The San Diego Community College District’s (SDCCD) economic impact in San Diego County hit $5.7 billion last year, up from $5.2 billion in 2013-14.  In total, the district’s economic impact is equal to 3.1 percent of the county’s gross regional product, according to a new analysis.

The analysis by Idaho-based Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI) looked at spending by the district on everything from payroll to construction, in addition to the higher wages and spending from current and former students that is attributed to the education they received at the district.

“In addition to educating over 100,000 students to enter the workforce or to transfer to universities, the San Diego Community College District has and immense impact on the regional economy,” said SDCCD Chancellor Constance M. Carroll.  “Our colleges, our adult education campuses, and our multifaceted operations combine to provide an impressive return-on-investment.  We are proud of this and believe that this is important information for our community to have.”

The SDCCD employed 4,760 full-time and part-time faculty and staff last year, 95 percent of whom lived in San Diego County.  Total payroll was $237.2 million, much of which was spent in the region for food, clothing, housing, and entertainment, while the overall impact of operations spending reaching more than $445 million.  Construction spending attributed to voter-approved Propositions S and N added an additional $64.8 million and created 875 new jobs.

The accumulated impact of former students currently employed in the San Diego County workforce amounted to $5 billion in the Gross Regional Product, which is equivalent to creating 71,223 new jobs. In fact, the district is the region’s largest provider of workforce training.

“From manufacturing to software to life sciences, the district trains and guides the talent in industries that matter most to San Diego’s innovation economy,” said Mark Cafferty, president and CEO of San Diego Regional EDC. “This report reconfirms something we say time and time again: Investing in our community colleges means investing in our economy.”

The EMSI report used a wide array of data that included district academic and financial reports, along with industry and employment analysis from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau. Among the findings:

  • Taxpayers provided $334.5 million of state and local funding to the district, and will receive an estimated present-day value of $1.6 billion in added tax revenue stemming from students’ higher lifetime incomes and the increased output of businesses at which they work.  Reduced demand for government-funded social services yields a savings of $100.5 million.  All told, for every tax dollar spent on educating students attending the district, taxpayers will receive an average of $4.90 in return over the course of the students’ working lives – an annual rate of return of 16.2 percent.
  • In terms of societal benefits, the SDCCD and its students invested $1.3 billion in students’ educations during the analysis year.  For every dollar of this investment, society as a whole in California will receive a cumulative value of $14.80 in benefits, equal to the $19.9 billion in benefits divided by the $1.3 billion in costs.
  • Students will earn a present-day value of $3.4 billion in increased earnings over their working lives, thanks to the greater marketability due to the education they are receiving. This translates to a return of $4.20 in higher future income for every $1 that students pay for their education at the SDCCD – an annual rate of return of 17.7 percent.

Content provided by San Diego Community College District.


August 4, 2015

The job hunting game is changing. If you’re a programmer looking to score a job at a tech company or a recruiter looking for talent, you are probably placing less of an emphasis on job fairs. Instead, you are probably taking part in the modern-day tech career fair equivalent: a Hackathon.

Contrary to what the name entails, a Hackathon  – at least as we know it – is not a large scale event where people gather to hack into computers and networks. Rather, it’s a multi-day event, where people converge to engage in collaborative computer programming.

Beginning Oct. 2, more than 1,000 students from across the world will meet in San Diego for 36 hours at SDHacks. What started as an idea by the UC San Diego Triton Engineering Student Council (TESC) has already morphed into a grand-scale event. So far, of the 1,000 student signed up, two-thirds of them hail from outside the San Diego region, making SDHacks an attractive place for companies looking for talent.

With companies like Microsoft and Qualcomm already signed up to sponsor, the Hackathon promises to attract some of the best and brightest students from across the globe. 

EDC’s economic development committee has been supporting the work of the TESC. We’re looking for companies to join us in making this a success and ensuring that many of these talented job seekers know San Diego isn’t just a nice place to participate in a Hackathon, but that it’s an excellent place to launch a career.  

Interested? Contact Ashley Swartout at as@sandiegobusiness.org

 

July 31, 2015

San Diego Regional EDC, (EDC), Equinox Center, the Center on Policy Initiatives (CPI),and Posiba - with funding from The San Diego Foundation - launched INSIGHT San Diego yesterday. As the collaborative  planned the future of our region, they recognized the need to take record of how and where progress is measured.

This collective is an informative web platform designed to educate policy makers and the community on issues relevant to our regional quality of life- social equity, economic resilience, and environmental sustainability. 

“As we envisioned the future of our region, many recognized our need to also take inventory of where we are and measure our progress,” said Mark Cafferty, president and CEO of San Diego EDC. “We hope this collaboration with real time, unbiased feedback will inspire all to see that our varied perspectives can enrich the understanding of our region. These are truly exciting times for San Diego.”

Notably, an aspect of this vision is to make data more available for use by local municipalities, planning councils and service organizations as they consider the future of their respective communities, along with the needs and desires of their populations.

"INSIGHT San Diego emerged from local partnerships with the mutual interest of building a sustainable region. Equinox Center relies on these partnerships with leading organizations to increase its impact and continue building a healthy environment, strong economy and vibrant communities,” stated Stephen Heverly, managing director, Equinox Center.

This is the first installment in this collaborative effort to use data research and analytics. INSIGHT San Diego is designed to measure progress on advancing the priorities identified by 30,000 San Diego residents in Our Greater San Diego Vision, supported by The San Diego Foundation, for improving quality of life throughout the region. More recently, a University of Southern California study, Linking Innovation With Inclusion, identified our region’s growing diversity as an untapped source of strength for our innovation economy. 

According to Clare Crawford, executive director at CPI, “Equity is integral to having a healthy environment and a strong and sustainable economy in San Diego. This project is a great first step in having our researchers come together and look at the issues affecting our region. Through cross sector collaborations like these we hope to move San Diego forward."

Additionally, the project will analyze the region’s innovation, competition, and local talent attraction in order to continue the momentum of national attention San Diego has recently received from entities including Forbes and Inc., who boast San Diego’s rapidly advancing startup culture. San Diego was also just featured by National Geographic as part of its "World's Smart Cities" series, as one of 18 cities featured from around the world, showcasing San Diego’s quality of life, technology sector, and local modernizers.

You can view pictures from the launch here: goo.gl/UcK4qQ

EDC's participation in the project was made possible by the Morgan Family Foundation

Please check out INSIGHT San Diego at insightsandiego.info and let us know what you think. Join the conversation at #INSIGHTsd

June 23, 2015

When Mark Cafferty was recruited to take the reins at EDC in 2011, his first assignment was simple. Then executive committee member Vincent Mudd asked him to “tell us what the cover of Fortune Magazine will look like in five years.” A few days later, Mark came back with a well-crafted cover displayed in English, Spanish and Japanese. It is anecdotes like this that have defined EDC over the past 50 years.

Almost five years later, Vincent Mudd, now serving as chairman of EDC, delivered his annual talk at EDC’s 50th Annual Dinner.  Combing through the archives, he pays homage to EDC’s past – recounting the transformative leadership that has shaped the region  – and gives us a glimpse into what the future might look like.

Watch below: 

May 19, 2015

Point Loma Nazarene LogoSan Diego Regional EDC’s Annual Dinner will be held on June 4, 2015 at Sea World San Diego. Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) is once again serving as the underwriter for this year’s 50th Anniversary celebration.

We sat down with PLNU president, and EDC board member, Dr. Bob Brower to learn more about PLNU and what’s in store for the future - as they work together with the region’s other universities, to help develop San Diego’s next generation of leaders.

1) Tell us about PLNU.

Founded in Pasadena, California in 1902, PLNU moved to Point Loma in 1973 with 1,000 students. Since coming to San Diego, PLNU has experienced unprecedented institutional growth and development alongside the rapidly growing San Diego region. Today we serve over 3,600 students at our residential campus in Point Loma, in regional centers across Southern California and online.

As a liberal arts institution, PLNU is known for being forward-thinking. At PLNU, academics, faith, and community are all vital. Students benefit from this balanced approach to education and leave PLNU prepared to think, act, and contribute to San Diego and the world.  During our four decades in San Diego we have become an institution known for excellence in academic preparation, wholeness in personal development, and faithfulness to mission.

2) Ensuring San Diego has a steady stream of talented university grads is essential to our regional competitiveness strategy. What are some of the advantages to having your university located in San Diego?

It is the accessible and collaborative character of our region that provides an unparalleled advantage to our students and compels PLNU to remain invested in San Diego.

Dr. Brower on why PLNU thrives in SD

Our students benefit from a region that is invested in developing talent to compete on the world stage - while maintaining a distinctly regional focus. Furthermore, the collaborative relationships that exist among San Diego’s robust and diverse higher education and business communities further affirms our respective institutions’ commitment to educational quality for the benefit of our students and the future of San Diego.

Through faculty leadership and community support, our students and alumni actively contribute to regional dialogue and potential solutions on a variety of issues. PLNU’s Fermanian Business and Economic Institute is actively informing local economic policy in the areas of housing affordability, military economic impact and homelessness. The Center for Justice and Reconciliation at PLNU serves as a regional convener of local law enforcement, nonprofit agencies and policy makers in the continued campaign against human trafficking in San Diego. Our Institute for Politics and Public Service, through the Malin Burnham Center for Civic Engagement, is engaged in the study and practice of civil discourse together with the promotion of the quality of life in a community, through both political and non-political processes. School of Nursing faculty and students are invested in the community of City Heights through PLNU’s Health Promotion Center, providing health education, screening and access to care.

3) What do you anticipate for PLNU in the next 5 years?

Steven Mintz, writing in The Chronicle of Higher Education, explained more than two years ago that “higher education is now in a revolution of change.” American colleges and universities are experiencing the most rapid and dramatic changes in history – PLNU is no exception.

Preparing students as effective leaders in a rapidly changing world is not a new calling for PLNU; it is the foundation of our history and work. For generations, PLNU has developed students deep in conviction and life skills who were academically well prepared to meet the challenges and opportunities of their day.

In effort to support this development, PLNU will celebrate the completion of our new science complex this summer. With nearly 40 percent of PLNU’s undergraduate students majoring in one of the STEM-related disciplines, this much-needed facility reflects the quality of our faculty and students, further strengthening the undergraduate research programs which offer students the ability to conduct faculty mentored research. This hallmark of the undergraduate science experience at PLNU produces graduates ready for future doctoral research and equipped to serve in San Diego’s life science and high tech clusters – but it is not unique to the STEM disciplines.  As in the past, we will continue to develop critical and ethical thinkers equipped to meet San Diego’s workforce needs in the STEM, humanities and business fields.

PLNU remains focused on strengthening and expanding our distinctive learning community and enhancing our ability to respond proactively to the dynamic environment of higher education and the San Diego region. We continue to develop strategies and programs for degree access beyond the traditional, residential campus. Whether through new hybrid and online programs in advanced studies or adult degree completion, or baccalaureate partnerships with the region’s community colleges, we strive to serve new populations of students, thus allowing PLNU to further meet the workforce development needs in our region and prepare effective leaders who impact San Diego and the world.

4) What do you anticipate for the San Diego region?

As a region, San Diego is not immune to change. Building upon a unique culture of creativity and collaboration, San Diego has - and will continue to - distinguish itself as a leader in innovation, defense, healthcare, and tourism sectors. This necessitates the training and development of human capital in a variety of ways to better meet San Diego’s current and future workforce needs.

May 18, 2015

 

We all have to start our career somewhere. And that ‘somewhere,’ whether it’s running the local paper route or dipping cones at the local ice cream shop, has a strong impact on the rest of our careers. While these first jobs may not uncover one’s lifelong passion, they often do translate into invaluable skills you carry with you for the rest of your career.

That’s one reason why CONNECT2Careers (C2C), a youth summer employment initiative administered by the San Diego Workforce Partnership (SDWP), has launched the #MyFirstJobSD video campaign. To raise awareness for the need to increase youth employment in San Diego, C2C asked a number of prominent San Diegans to reminisce about their first job—what it was, what it taught them and what advice they would give their younger selves. The result is a series of short, inspiring #MyFirstJobSD videos. Featured San Diegans include Mayor Kevin Faulconer, NBC 7 anchor Marianne Kushi, San Diego Regional Chamber CEO Jerry Sanders, and State Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins. New videos will continue to be released through June.

“The #MyFirstJobSD campaign is meant to remind us what our first job meant to us and encourage the opening of doors to our future workforce,” says Peter Callstrom, CEO of SDWP. “Summer employment through C2C is a great way to gain experience and for employers to invest in the up-and-coming talent pool.”

C2C encourages San Diegans to use social media to spread the word about the #MyFirstJobSD campaign, share your first job story using the hashtag, ask others what their first job was, and keep the conversation going. 

May 1, 2015


In an effort to further the region’s global competitiveness, a delegation of San Diego business leaders will be heading to London next week to increase existing synergies between one of San Diego’s most important international partners.  Building on existing relationships, the delegation will host the London premiere of National Geographic’s “World’s Smart Cities: San Diego” documentary, meet with key companies with San Diego ties, and promote opportunities in industries that matter most to San Diego’s competitiveness such as life sciences and connected health.

The San Diego – London ties run deep. Findings from the Go Global San Diego Initiative, released in March 2015, confirmed just how intertwined the two regions' economies are.  Collectively, the U.K. accounts form 25 percent of all foreign employment, or 12,340 jobs in San Diego. Some of these major London-based companies with San Diego ties include BAE Systems, Cobham, GlaxoSmithKline and Mirum. San Diego is also home to Cubic, a transportation innovator that powers London’s OysterCard system.

Key agenda highlights from the mission include a UC Alumni Event Showcase, where UC San Diego Dean Al Pisano will lead a discussion with UC alumni working and living in London to activate stronger ties in the life sciences, telecommunications, cybersecurity and software engineering sectors. The delegation will participate on a joint panel about driving down the cost of healthcare (arranged by Biocom and its UK counterpart, OneNucleus) and visit “The Catapult,” London’s urban innovation lab that aims to strengthen quality of life, economies and the environment in cities around the globe. While overseas, the delegation will also meet with key partners and companies including the U.S. Embassy in London, British Airways, BAE and Ebsta.

The trip builds off exciting exchanges between the two regions. London is the first international city to join the Global Cities Initiative (GCI), a joint project between the Brookings Institution and JPMorgan Chase, which works to help leaders reorient their economies towards greater engagement in world markets. San Diego has been a member of the GCI since Fall 2012. This affiliation has incubated a strong relationship with London + Partners, the economic development arm of the city of London. In February, Mayor Faulconer joined London Mayor Boris Johnson at the Brookings Institution  in D.C. to discuss how these two regions can strengthen their global connections.

The delegation includes:

  • Al Pisano, Dean, Jacobs School of Engineering, UC San Diego
  • Andrew Lee, President & CEO, ESET
  • Diane Law, Parachute Marketing
  • George Guerra, Vice President, HALE Enterprise Strategic Ventures, Northrop Grumman
  • Hampton Brown, Director, Air Service Development, San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
  • Iris Magid, Director of Industry Engagement and University Relations, UC San Diego
  • Jennifer Landress, Senior Vice President & COO, Biocom
  • Joe Terzi, President & CEO, San Diego Tourism Authority
  • Joe Timko, Director of Public Relations, San Diego Tourism Authority
  • Julian Parra, Senior Vice President & Market Executive, Global Commercial Banking, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
  • Kerri Kapich, Senior Vice President of Marketing, San Diego Tourism Authority
  • Lauree Sahba, COO, San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation
  • Neva Parker, Head of Laboratory Operations, WhiteLabs
  • Phil Blair, President & CEO, Manpower San Diego & Chair, San Diego Convention Center
  • Robert Brownlie, Managing Partner, DLA Piper & Vice President, UC San Diego Alumni Board of Directors
  • Robert Gleason, Chairman of the Board, San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
  • The Honorable Scott Peters, Congressman (CA 52)
  • Sean Barr, Vice President, San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation
  • Shelley Lyford, COO, West Health Institute & President, Gary & Mary West Foundation
  • Thella Bowens, President & CEO, San Diego County Regional Airport Authority
  • Vince Mudd, Chair, San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation
  • William Burfitt, Executive Director of Development, UC San Diego

If you’re a company that wants to increase its engagement with foreign markets – such as London – apply for the MetroConnect prize. Thanks to the generosity of JPMorgan Chase, EDC is providing select San Diego-based companies with up to $10,000 in matching funds to help with each company’s next steps in going global. The deadline is Monday at noon.  

Follow the conversation at

April 22, 2015

Perhaps nothing encapsulates San Diego’s mix of innovation and lifestyle more than the surfboard pictured below. Let us explain…

Although it looks like any other surfboard, it’s actually made from algae, instead of petroleum-based polyurethane which is typically found in surfboards. We have Stephen Mayfield, a scientist from UC San Diego and director of the California Center for Algae Biotechnology, to thank for that. Like quite a few San Diegans, he can call himself both a scientist and a surfer.

Mayfield is featured in “National Geographic Channel’s: World’s Smart Cities” documentary about San Diego, which premiered last night at San Diego Symphony Hall.  Following the documentary, Mayfield presented the world’s first algae-based surfboard to Mayor Kevin Faulconer. Surfing legend and San Diego local Rob Machado, who also appeared in the documentary, was on hand to help present the surfboard. In the documentary, Mayfield talks about industry/academic collaborations that are helping to make biofuels from algae a commercially viable transportation fuel in the future. 

The documentary follows San Diego’s innovation narrative as National Geographic host and Digital Nomad Andrew Evans gets his genome sequenced at Illumina, performs stem cell surgery on a penguin at SeaWorld, flies UAVS at Northrop Grumman, learns about the Smart Grid at SDG&E, checks out the Qualcomm® Thinkabit Lab™,  part engineering lab and part art studio – all while enjoying the sites, culture and lifestyle that San Diego is known for.

Last night, Andrew Evans made the trek back to San Diego to join Mayor Kevin Faulconer, San Diego Tourism Authority’s Joe Terzi, EDC’s Mark Cafferty and a packed house of San Diegans to show people why San Diego is the only city in North America chosen for the documentary.

"San Diego is a neat city. There's no place like it in the world," said Evans at the premiere.  

The documentary will be shown in more than 60 countries, reaching approximately 250 million households world-wide.  Make sure to tune in (or record) the documentary, which begins airing this Saturday, on the National Geographic Channel.

Spread the word. It’s time the world learns what San Diego is really about.



Follow the conversation at #Smartcities.

March 24, 2015

CSUSM 25th Anniversary Logo

This year, Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) celebrates its 25th anniversary. As the only comprehensive public university in North County, they are a major source of talent for San Diego’s dynamic companies. Together with the region’s other universities, they help ensure San Diego’s global competitiveness.

We sat down with Dr. Haynes, president of CSUSM, to hear more about how the university has evolved over the past 25 years and what’s in store for the future.

1) Tell us about CSUSM.
For many years, the University was considered North County’s best-kept secret. Not anymore – the secret is out, Cal State San Marcos is THE university to be at. With 13,000 students and growing, we are nationally considered a large university and we are regionally a high-demand, first-choice institution. CSUSM is the place where dedicated and talented faculty facilitate the success of our students—our region’s future leaders and change-makers. It’s the place where area businesses and organizations partner to foster economic growth and create real-world learning experiences for the sake of stronger communities. And it’s a place with a track record of accomplishments. CSUSM has recently received national recognition for best practices as a model employer, a diverse and military-friendly campus, and a community-engaged institution.

2) Ensuring San Diego has a steady stream of talented university grads is essential to our regional competitiveness strategy. What are some of the advantages to having your university located in San Diego?
CSUSM on collaborations with the business community CSUSM is the only public comprehensive university in North San Diego County and we take that role very seriously. Beginning in 2006, we began establishing guaranteed admission agreements with 10 regional school districts, to ensure that students are prepared for college and supported throughout their entire educational journey.We are the only university in our state with a program of this magnitude – creating a college-bound culture for some 200,000 students from across our region.

We have also placed a particular focus on serving educationally at-risk students. We have the highest per-capita numbers, within the CSU system, of student populations often excluded or overlooked by higher education, including Veterans, former foster youth and Native Americans.For the last two years, 52 percent of our graduating classes were the first in their families to obtain a four-year degree.

We are very proud that not only do the vast majority of our students come from our region, but that after graduation some 85 percent of them remain here, equipped with profession-ready skills, creative talents, global awareness and homegrown commitment to help power the regional economy. Our sister public universities in the San Diego region have important roles, each of us filing a unique niche. While CSUSM serves all types of students, we have a strong focus on underrepresented and diverse student populations and those who stay after graduation to give back to their communities and contribute to the regional economy.

3) San Diego is full of dynamic companies, firms and service providers influencing global trends and innovation.   CSUSM is very engaged with many of them. Pick a San Diego-area company that’s at the top of its game.
One dynamic company and CSUSM corporate partner that comes to mind is ViaSat, a communication company located in Carlsbad.

Because it is always looking with an eye toward the future, ViaSat has been an invaluable CSUSM champion, providing support and expertise across campus to develop our students and provide real-world learning opportunities. Just to name a few examples:  They support our on-campus Summer Scholars program, which actively engages undergraduates in hands-on STEM research through a 10-week program; they provide multiple internship opportunities to our undergraduate students; and they sponsor events across campus, such as our recent Super STEM Saturday, a celebration of innovation and science education designed to expose and engage kids of all ages, and their families, to the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Several of ViaSat’s senior leaders volunteer their time and expertise on multiple college advisory boards, and ViaSat’s President and COO, Rick Baldridge even offered leadership advice and insight into the company and his career path by speaking at “In the Executive’s Chair” – a business course where students hear and learn from regional business leaders. The company’s leadership and input was also invaluable as we developed our new Cybersecurity Professional Master’s Degree.

4) What do you anticipate for the CSUSM in the next 5 years? What do you anticipate for the San Diego region?
For 25 years, there has been great synergy between the University and our region. We have literally grown up together, coming of age as we have helped create, and were fed and nurtured by, regional businesses, organizations, schools, neighborhoods and cities.  Moving forward over the next five years and beyond, we will continue to drive forward as a place of community engagement, a place for academic excellence and research, and a place for welcoming and stimulating environments supporting the success of the rich diversity of students we serve.

We know that the San Diego region will continue to have workforce needs in multiple areas, including the life sciences, healthcare and information and communication technologies.  To meet these demands we continue to survey key stakeholders in multiple business and nonprofit sectors to learn about their expectations and create innovative degree and certificate programs to fill those needs.  Among these are new or planned programs such as our master’s degree program in public health and health information management; stackable certificates, potentially leading to master’s degrees, in international business, business intelligence, tourism and hospitality; and professional master’s degrees in cybersecurity and biotechnology.  Efforts like these are part of our commitment to ensure that our students graduate career-ready to serve the needs of our region.

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