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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


SDMAC

June 24, 2016

San Diego’s large and complex concentration of Navy and Marine Corp personnel and assets face a wide variety of challenges ranging from budget pressures under sequestration to consequences of changing geopolitical strategies like the rebalance to the Pacific.  With more than 22 percent of San Diego’s GDP tied to our military and defense industrial base, this sector is a critical driver of the region’s economy.

This connectivity is why EDC works in close partnership with the San Diego Military Advisory Council (SDMAC) to develop strategies to support the region’s military through a coordinated DC strategy. SDMAC, with its extensive group of retired flag officers, has the network and understanding necessary to advocate for the defense industry in San Diego as they face budget and geopolitical pressures. 

This year, EDC joined SDMAC for its annual DC trip, where Executive Director Randy Bogle and President Ward Wilson met with senior Navy and Marine Corp commanders and our local congressional delegation to discuss how best we can continue to support the military in San Diego.

Meetings in DC ranged from conversations with Navy Surgeon General, Vice Admiral Forest Faison on how best to continue to build partnerships in our medical community to ensure the long-term wellbeing of our veteran population, to conversations with Assistant Secretary of the Navy Sean Stackley about the importance of our shipbuilders in San Diego and how future ship deployments will impact the region. Conversations at the Pentagon were followed by a series of meetings with San Diego’s congressional delegation, whose leadership positions on the HASC and other key committees continue to prove valuable to San Diego. Maintaining a presence in DC with trips such as this are critical to our being effective allies for the region’s military. 

September 25, 2015

 

As one of the foundations of San Diego’s economy, the military plays an integral role in San Diego’s economic vitality. Between the release of San Diego Military Advisory Council’s (SDMAC) 7th annual Military Economic Impact Report, the Governors Military Council (GMC) quarterly board meeting and the upcoming  airshow at MCAS Miramar, the military has been on the radar for many San Diegans this month.  

At the release of the SDMAC economic impact study this past Wednesday, updated data confirmed just how important the military is to San Diego’s economy:

·         The military sector is responsible for about 328,000 -  22 percent - of the region’s total jobs in 2015 after accounting for all of the ripple effects of defense spending – an increase from last year’s 317,000 jobs. 

·         An estimated total of $24.8 billion in direct spending related to defense was sent to San Diego County during fiscal year 2015, an amount equal to about $7,700 for each of the county’s residents.

·         In fiscal year 2015, the 49 U.S. Navy ships home-ported in San Diego will see direct spending of about $2.6 billion, which will equate to a total economic impact of $5.7 billion in GRP.

·         The two aircraft carriers based here will bring a combined $1.5 billion to the economy based on updated inputs, multipliers, and models.  San Diego’s home-ported ship count is projected to climb to a total of 84 by calendar year 2023.

Although these are impressive numbers in themselves, they do not capture the depth of the defense sector. Case in point: in the early ‘70s, two engineers – Irwin Jacobs and Andrew Viterbi -- received a SPAWAR contract to  advance communications technologies (CMDA). Years later, Jacobs would go on to form Qualcomm, San Diego’s largest private-sector employer, and the home of the modern day cell phone.  That is just one example - San Diego’s military drives billions of dollars of research to the region, attracts talent from around the country, and has proven to be instrumental in inspiring major technological innovations impacting both the defense and commercial markets.

 In addition to the numerous elected officials on hand for the study release, the Governor’s Military Council (GMC) simultaneously held its quarterly board meeting in San Diego. Started as an advisory council to protect California’s assets, the GMC became a standing committee with the passage of AB 442, which was signed into law on September 21. While in town, the GMC toured several military staples, including NASSCO, SPAWAR and Naval Base Point Loma. Building on the announcement and the momentum of the GMC’s statewide strategy release, EDC is working in close partnership with SDMAC to ensure San Diego’s key military interests are represented in the GMC's actions. We are pleased to confirm that RADM (ret.) Ken Slaght, a former commander of SPAWAR and the co-chair of the Cyber Center of Excellence (CCOE), will join the GMC as its newest member.    
               
 Our military drives innovation, attracts a diverse set of talent and remains the single most critical industry in terms of impact on our GRP.  The looming threat of sequestration coupled with leadership uncertainties in D.C. confirm that we need to stay diligent and focused as a region to provide the concerted effort required to adequately support our key military installations and our defense industrial base. Our economy depends on it.

 

September 27, 2013

The Fifth Annual SDMAC Military Impact Study was released this week, quantifying the impact of the military's boot print on the San Diego region. Although sequestration has authorized military cutbacks, the region still has a strong defense cluster, with $25 billion flowing into our economy and more than one in five jobs (22 percent) linked to military spending.  The study also illustrated how the defense sector is linked to other sector of the region's economy.

Military Impact Infographic

Media Coverage:

 

Coverage:

ABC 10 , San Diego Military Advisory Council releases Military Economic Impact Study

NBC 7, Local Economic Impact from Military Budget Cuts

KPBS, More military cutbacks will be felt in San Diego’s pocketbook

 

March 27, 2013

San Diego Regional EDC and a number of partners from industry organizations and private companies are working to attain status as a center of excellence (COE) for unmanned systems. San Diego is already well known for developing and manufacturing unmanned autonomous systems (UAS). The industry supports more than 7,000 jobs and accounts for more than 12 percent of all Department of Defense contracting activities in San Diego County, according to an industry report prepared by the San Diego North Chamber of Commerce. The report also concluded that the industry has the potential to double its economic impact over the next seven years. Recently, Northrop Grumman announced that the company would designate its Rancho Bernardo facility as their center of excellence for UAS development. The move is expected to bring an additional 300 jobs to the San Diego region.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued the request for information. They intend to designate six Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) test sites across the Continental United States in order to integrate UAS into national airspace.

The geographic area of the proposed site encompasses a vast area of land extending from Edwards Air Force Base and the Naval Air Weapons Station at China Lake south to the Mexican border and east to the Arizona border. The regional coalition includes San Diego Military Advisory Council, Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems, Imperial Valley EDC, County of Imperial, Holtville Airport in Imperial County, and defense contractors including General Atomics, Cubic, Epsilon Systems and Northrop Grumman. This group joined forces with the California Unmanned Air Systems Portal, based in Indian Wells in Riverside County, which enabled the proposal to include such a large area. The proposed test range region is geographically diverse, including airspace over mountain ranges, high and low desert, and the ocean.

About 40 applications have been submitted seeking to become one of the six test sites.