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Inside EDC

October 4, 2013

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More than 80 business and industry leaders gathered at the Challenged Athletes Foundation to mark the launch of San Diego County's Sports and Active Lifestyle Cluster Report, which quantified the impact of the cluster for the first time. In order to celebrate the industry and learn about challenges, a panel of sports innovators and experts who included John Sarkisian of SKLZ, Peter Callstrom of San Diego Workforce Partnership, and Stephan Aarstol of Tower Paddle Boards, spoke about a variety of topics related to the cluster. Opening remarks from Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and Council President Pro Tem Sherri Lightner emphasized the importance of the industry to both the region's economy and cultural identity. 

Funded by San Diego Workforce Partnership with assistance from San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation and San Diego Sport Innovators, the study found that the economic impact of the region’s SAL cluster is equivalent to hosting four Super Bowls annually.
 
With more than 1,200 businesses representing approximately 23,000 employees, the industry’s presence on the regional economy adds $2.24 billion in economic activity annually. From 2012-2013, the employment in the sports and active lifestyle cluster outpaced that of the entire county, growing 3-5 percent in the SAL cluster, compared to 1-2 percent growth in San Diego County. Overall, the industry accounted for 1.3 percent of the region’s economy in 2011.
 
“With the release of the study, we have concrete data to talk about a growing industry that is an important part of San Diego’s story,” said Mark Cafferty, president & CEO of San Diego Regional Economic Development Corporation. “As home to the second highest concentration of sports and active lifestyle workers in the U.S., this economic driver has an important place in the region’s innovation economy.”
 
Home to miles of beaches and favorable weather, the study also concluded that San Diego’s natural assets are one of the reasons the region has excelled in forming this cluster.
 
“San Diego is every sports and active lifestyle company’s ideal location,” said Lisa Freedman, executive director of SD Sport Innovators. “While there are other important and larger verticals in San Diego, the sports and active lifestyle cluster is a very strong community where authenticity goes hand in hand with innovation. As a result, people around the globe not only purchase and use, but they also rely on products developed and manufactured right here in Southern California.”
 
As part of the workforce assessment, the study surveyed numerous local companies to determine their employment needs. With 32,407 jobs dependent upon sports, active lifestyle and recreation related activities, cultivating a strong workforce is essential to growing the industry.
 
“As a unified region, our goal is to forge partnerships with businesses, universities and government to ensure that companies continue to find the talent they need so the region can retain its share of the sports innovation industry, ” said Peter Callstrom, president and CEO of San Diego Workforce Partnership.
 
In order to continue grooming the industry for growth, the report concluded with recommendations for helping sports innovation companies thrive including supporting entrepreneurial skills and strengthening cross-border ties for manufacturing partnerships.
 
Check out the executive summary and complete study for more information. More pictures from the event can be found here
 

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August 19, 2013
This summer, EDC participated in Connect2Careers,a program that places young adults in summer internship programs across San Diego. Funded by the City of San Diego, the program works to address San Diego’s ongoing skills gap by providing meaningful summer work experiences that prepare young adults for in-demand jobs.
 
Before he heads back to school this fall, we gave our Intern Regan Pecjak one last assignment: reflect on his internship experience. Here’s what he had to say:
 
Supervisor Daichi Pantaleon with Regan PecjakWhen I began my internship at San Diego Regional EDC at the beginning of the summer I was in a position that I feel was representative of many San Diegans; I had only a vague idea of what economic development was and had absolutely no idea how it would pan out. The past weeks at EDC have given me an intimate understanding of both and provided me with an experience that I would have never had without the Connect2Careers program. 
 
Working at EDC has given me the opportunity to learn firsthand how the region is marketed to businesses and of the various efforts to expand the region’s economy. One of the major projects at EDC during my time here as the Brookings Institute’s Metropolitan Export Initiative. The plan is meant to address the under performance of San Diego’s international exports; despite having the 17th largest metro area population, San Diego’s export production ranks 55th. Sitting in these meetings gave me an in-depth understanding of the nature of some components of the region’s economy. 
 
Sitting in meetings and honing my office skills were not the only things I did; I really enjoyed the research assignments I was given. One of my favorite assignments involved researching incentives that US cities offer businesses to expand and relocate. It helped me understand what goes into creating a successful business climate and even got me thinking about some ideas that could potentially improve our own region!
 
After seven weeks at EDC, I’m happy to report that it’s been an invaluable experience. Working downtown provided me with access to key policy makers, as well as an informal network of economic development professionals. Within EDC’s walls, my co-workers were extremely cordial and were happy to talk with me. Thanks to the San Diego Regional EDC and the Connect2Careers program, I’ve had an excellent summer.  
 
Dec. 2013 update: EDC likes to keep in touch with interns following their experience to further help them on their professional paths. We're excited to share that Regan has been accepted early to Harvard. Although he is undecided on his major, he hopes to focus on economics and mathematics, while further exploring his interest in public service. Congratulations Regan!
 
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August 8, 2013
 Some have asked us to issue a formal statement on behalf of EDC celebrating the life of our dear friend Duane Roth. We believe that CONNECT, BIOCOM and others have already done so quite beautifully. So in a less formal fashion, I would like to share the following thoughts and reflections...
 
To try to write down what Duane Roth meant to San Diego Regional EDC, and our entire binational economic development community, is next to impossible. 
 
As most of you know, Duane was a longtime board member. He was our past chair. He was our partner on countless projects and our constant supporter behind the scenes. He was an incredible thinker. He was a visionary in the truest sense of the word. He was our motivator, our agitator and our confidant. But above all, he was our friend.
 
For me personally, having the opportunity to work so closely with Duane for the past 19 months has turned out to be a greater blessing than I could have ever imagined. Looking back, it seems as if Duane and I were doing something together just about every day.
 
We spoke on countless panels together--telling the story of our traded economies. We worked to create a collaborative economic development agenda for our organizations and our region. We planned meetings together. We supported each other's grant writing and fundraising efforts. We traveled together and lobbied together. And along the way, we spent a lot of time talking about our work, our economy and our community.
 
Duane changed the way we think and talk about San Diego. His personality and professional will made us bigger, stronger and better. He believed we were great and he made sure the world knew that. He used his influence to open doors, his intellect to create opportunities and his determination to earn broad-reaching respect and admiration. 
 
Duane always went about everything he did with a sense of importance and urgency. At times, none of us could move fast enough for him. In hindsight, it's almost as if he knew that he had very little time to waste. 
 
Like many, I will spend the days ahead thinking about what role I can play in carrying on his legacy. I will take the messages that I have heard him share with so many and ensure that I continue to share them with everyone I can. I will do my very best to see through the projects we started together and I will constantly try to do for others what Duane did for me. 
 
On Saturday, when I first learned that Duane had passed away, I immediately thought of a quote from John Steinbeck that I have always loved. It reads:
 
"It is so much darker when a light goes out than it would have been if it had never shone." 
 
As dark as it may seem today, I can't help but think of how lucky we all are for having shared this remarkable light.
 
I will never forget Duane.  I will never forget what he shared with me and what he taught me. And in saying goodbye, I can only think of the words of the Irish Blessing I learned as a child: "...until we meet again, may God always hold you in the palm of His hand."
 
With deep sorrow and enduring hope, 
 
Mark
 
July 29, 2013

Aerospace is part of a large and thriving Aerospace, Navigation & Maritime Technologies (ANMT) cluster in San Diego. Among the 25 most populous U.S. metropolitan areas, San Diego ranks second in the concentration of ANMT employment behind longtime aerospace leader Seattle.

 The cluster accounts for more than 20 percent of San Diego’s innovation economy, more than any other cluster except Information and Communication Technologies. San Diego’s growing unmanned aerial systems (UAS) sector presents a unique opportunity for companies in the Aerospace industry, with cutting-edge applications being developed in San Diego and throughout California. Currently, 60 percent of U.S. technology development in unmanned systems is performed in San Diego County, according to National University System Institute for Policy Research. With the rise in commercial and consumer uses, this industry sector is well positioned to carry the aerospace industry forward and continue to attract top engineering talent to the region.

  Since the aerospace industry shares many components with other industries in the ANMT cluster, it is difficult to break down aerospace companies and employment from the rest of the cluster. Some of the key aerospace-specific components of the cluster include: Search, Detection, Navigation and Guidance; Aeronautical and Nautical System and Instrument Manufacturing; Aircraft Manufacturing including Aircraft Engine and Engine Parts Manufacturing; and Guided Missile and Space Vehicle Manufacturing. San Diego Regional EDC analyzes key economic metrics that are important to understanding the regional economy and San Diego's standing relative to other major metropolitan areas in the U.S. For more information about San Diego’s aerospace industry and the full run down on how San Diego is faring compared to other major metropolitan regions, see the July 2013 Economic Snapshot.

 

 

 

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June 19, 2013
EDC dashbaordEDC has set out to chart the health of the regional economy through our new dashboard. Statistics on the economy can often be confusing, and are rarely packaged together in one place. We’ve sorted through data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Economic Analysis, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, International Trade Administration and others to find the most compelling and indicative statistics on the San Diego economy. Using simple design principles, the dashboard is our one-stop shop for quick, at-a-glance data about our regional economy.
 
The dashboard provides baseline indicators on 20 different metrics to track the region’s standing among the 25 most populous U.S. metropolitan areas. They range from conventional economic indicators, such as unemployment rate and Gross Domestic Product, to less familiar quality of life indicators, like sunshine hours. Along with our Economic Snapshot, launched earlier this quarter, this new comparison format helps us understand how San Diego stacks up with other major metropolitan areas across the nation. 
 
Although the indicators will more or less stay the same, the numbers will be updated as new data becomes available. 
 
Please contact mpc@sandiegobusiness.org if you have any ideas on how to improve the dashboard. 
 
June 14, 2013
By Jennifer Storm
 
Breweries and biotech companies abound. Strong public/private collaboration. A modernized downtown. A breathtaking waterfront. Until I came back from Yokohoma, Japan last week, I thought San Diego was the only place where this existed.
 
I was representing EDC as part of the World Trade Center San Diego’s trade mission to Japan, along with BIOCOM and San Diego Regional Airport Authority, to learn about further strengthening ties between the two regions. Last week, I boarded a plane at Lindbergh Field. Nearly 12 hours later, on one of the most immaculate airplanes I have ever seen, I stepped foot in Narita Airport in Tokyo thanks to Japan Airlines' direct service. A few days and a bus ride later I found myself on the way to Yokohoma, Japan – San Diego’s sister city. 
 
From an economic standpoint, it’s an optimal time to launch flight service between San Diego and Japan. Much like the U.S., Japan is climbing out of recession. As such, they’ve adopted liberal spending policies – known as Abe-nomics –to spur investment and growth, so there is a strong potential for increased foreign direct investment .  
 
YokohamaWhile in Yokohoma, Japanese business leaders exhibited their strong interest in partnering with San Diego companies. We were met with a delegation of 40 business leaders who had ties to San Diego or were interested in creating them. The strong link between Yokohama and San Diego was very apparent- I even met the sole distributor of Stone Beer in Japan! 
 
Traveling to Japan also helped me put things in perspective back home. It’s amazing how two distinct countries could have so much in common, yet also have the opportunity to learn so much from one another. The infrastructure in Japan is outstanding. You can move from one place to another with absolute ease.  This is something we’re working on in San Diego, but admittedly, we’re just not there yet.
 
On the other hand, while touring a biotech company, I had the opportunity to chat with one employee who had previously spent time at the Salk Institute. He noted that although he prefers Japan on a personal level, he misses the creative freedom of working in the U.S.  If he discovered something while in his lab at Salk, he had the freedom to explore that opportunity, in the hopes that it would lead to further research. Although it varies from company to company, he echoed that Japan has more of a regimented work environment. 
 
Although each city has excelled in similar industries, we have a lot of lessons to learn from each other. After all, isn’t that what siblings are for?
 
To learn more about San Diego’s most recent business delegation to Japan, you can read Joe Panetta’s guest column in the U-T.  
 
May 30, 2013

San Diego Regional EDC 48th Annual Dinner

America leads the world in innovation says Jim Clifton, author of The Coming Jobs War and Chairman and CEO of Gallup, but innovation alone is not enough to fuel job growth. Clifton was in town to give the keynote speech at San Diego Regional EDC’s annual dinner. More than 800 people listened in almost total silence (no mean feat for a group that size) as Clifton talked about the difference between innovation and entrepreneurship. According to Clifton, we know how to test for intellectual talent and scout intellectual talent but we have no mechanism to determine who can best take those ideas to the marketplace. And without a customer, the best ideas do nothing for job creation.

Clifton picked up on the dinner’s recurring theme of collaboration as reflected in the comments of EDC Chairman Stath Karras and EDC President and CEO Mark Cafferty. He referred to his concept of “tribal leaders” in a community, those who constantly question and suggest new approaches to issues. “When leaders get their strength together, there is no limit to what you can do,” Clifton said, recognizing that most of the region’s leaders were in the room.

Clifton acknowledged one of San Diego’s best examples of a tribal leader – Malin Burnham – who was instrumental in bringing Clifton’s ideas to the business community and in bringing Clifton himself to San Diego.

Clifton made it clear that no one should be looking to Washington for solutions to America’s problems. “We have to win the world back one great city at a time,” he said.

EDC’s annual dinner also honored former EDC Chairman Bill Geppert with the Herb Klein Civic Leadership Award. Geppert was humble and gracious in his remarks, mentioning many beloved San Diegans who came before him as great civic leaders.

Many people took to twitter to discuss the event:

 

 

May 21, 2013

 

 
Boxing analogies abound around San Diego. Media coverage about the release of the San Diego Metropolitan Export Initiative last week included a quote that San Diego is punching below its weight in exports. 
 
A few days later, EDC’s President and CEO Mark Cafferty is quoted saying about San Diego “We’re punching below our weight.”
 
The U-T profile, penned by John Wilkens, took a deep dive into life in San Diego and at EDC with Mark, exploring his goals for EDC and San Diego, and most importantly, how he views the region:
“When you are speaking economically, San Diego has a lot of great things that happen here that are either in the shadow of other places when I don’t think they need to be, or the laid-back persona starts to cross over into places where I think we need to project a little stronger and bigger and smarter.”
 
With Mark’s guidance, EDC has strengthened its focus on economic development with the goal of creating jobs and maximizing the region’s economic prosperity and global competitiveness. 
 
 
Read the complete profile: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/May/18/cafferty-EDC-San-Diego-image/?#article-copy
 
 
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April 15, 2013

Photo Credit: Tony Manolatos

On the plane ride from Coronado to the U.S. Navy’s secluded San Clemente Island, more than one person made a reference to the hit dramatic series “Lost” and the eerie remoteness the TV show shared with our destination. From the plane you could see there wasn’t much to look at on this rugged and narrow stretch of land about 70 miles northwest of San Diego.

San Clemente Island is a place few civilians know about and even fewer see, but it plays a critical role in preparing the Navy to protect and serve. Every Navy SEAL, including the ones who took out Osama bin Laden, trains here at some point. Two “towns” have been built to resemble communities in the Middle East. It’s here where the SEALs, who train for two years before their first combat mission, practice missions at night. Snipers firing at moving targets inside buildings is just one of numerous clandestine training operations carried out routinely on the island.

At the far south end, Navy ships fire ashore while helicopters zero in on targets below. The U.S. Marines also use the island to conduct amphibious assault training and the FBI works there with Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal teams.  

The 21-mile island is just part of the story; to the west, an ocean area the size of California is where Naval ships and aircraft practice maneuvers.

No one lives on the island year-round and on off days you’ll find less than 100 people. The convenience store is stocked with chewing tobacco and is next door to the lone bar - the Salty Crab. All of the common areas, including the mess hall and the gym, are spotless. The Navy acquired San Clemente Island in 1934. Before that, it was home to goats and farmers.

Today, it is the Navy’s only remaining ship-to-shore live firing range, but it’s facing potential cutbacks due to sequestration. The Navy recently invited a Photo Credit: Tony Manolatoshandful of San Diegans to the island so we have a better understanding of the role it plays in military preparations.

During our visit, we heard just as much about the environment and wildlife as we heard about training exercises. On one part of the island, SEAL hopefuls were on Day 2 of “Hell Week” - which wasn’t even an afterthought among the biologists and botanists working to protect native plants and wildlife.

If the Navy encounters endangered species it stops training until the animals are safely removed from the area - a process that can take months and cost millions of dollars.

From a recent U-T San Diego story:

“The Navy spent more than $7 million last fiscal year to protect the island’s endangered or threatened species, which include 10 federally listed animals and plants.

"Now the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is considering delisting or downgrading the status of three protected species - the Island Night Lizard and two plants - because they are flourishing, said Sandy Vissman, the federal agency’s coordinator for the island.”

Adm. Dixon Smith and Capt. Gary Mayes led our visit of the 56-square-mile island on Tuesday (April 9), and we couldn’t have asked for better hosts.

These two men, and other men and women we met, care deeply about San Clemente Island, the training missions and the plants and animals who flourish there. They took the time to talk to each of us individually and answer all of our questions.

These are difficult times financially for the Navy and other military branches, but leaders like Adm. Smith and Capt. Mayes make it difficult for you to focus on the negative. We are fortunate to have such exceptional people committed to serving America.

As we said our goodbyes and left the island, we were again reminded of the TV series "Lost.”

The show frequently made viewers aware of one of life’s great lessons - it’s easier to succeed, and survive, with the help of others. Lost’s fascinating cast of characters constantly found themselves in need of support from others - in both obvious and unexpected ways.

On the plane ride home from San Clemente Island, we realized we now have a role in supporting the men and women on this remote patch of land. It was clear to us that it was our job to bring you their story, to write about our experiences, to do what we could to support the fascinating cast of characters we had just met. 

April 8, 2013

As an inveterate reader of the New York Times (online 24/6 and thick, wonderful print copy on Sunday) I was thrilled when I saw the Travel section was going to highlight San Diego in one of their “36 Hours in …” profiles.

Imagine my dismay when from the very first sentence I felt like the writer was describing a bad cartoon, poorly illustrated and lacking a solid punch line. Why should this matter to an economic development professional? Because not only is San Diego's convention and visitor industry the third largest industry in San Diego, it is also one of the ways we attract talent.  As one of the top 10 visitor and meeting destinations in the U.S., with more than 30 million visitors a year, it is no surprise that many of San Diego's knowledge workers first visited the region as a tourist or convention delegate.

So you can imagine that sentences that start with “If San Diego has an identity at all…” and a comparison to the movie Pleasantville (where two teens are sucked into their television into a black and white 1950's world which they slowly transform into color) would set a local’s teeth on edge.

I’d love to hear from the biotech entrepreneurs and the wireless communications wizards if that’s how they saw San Diego when They Came Here. And by the way, Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve, which is mentioned in the article, is across the street from some of the most advanced medical research facilities in the world. Believe me, the researchers love running the beach and the trails at lunch – year round.

Set aside for the moment whether the characterization is true or not (it’s not) and think about whether this kind of description would make you want to visit any location. Even Sioux Falls, South Dakota would want to be described in a more flattering way.

San Diego’s tech community has a reputation as open and welcoming and that’s one reason we’re successful at attracting the best and the brightest to work in our diverse technology clusters that range from defense to sports innovation, life sciences and clean tech.

Maybe it’s part of the California culture but it’s more than just “easy, breezy Southern California casualness.”