Future of Growth in San Diego: The Economic Case for Inclusion

Summary

The growth of San Diego’s innovation economy has made the region better educated and more prosperous than most other metros. However, this economic transformation presents new challenges for future growth. Changing skill requirements, a nationwide battle for talent, and a soaring cost of living are combining to form an unequivocal threat to our regional competitiveness. If unaddressed, San Diego will no longer be an attractive place to live and do business.

San Diego depends on a highly-educated workforce. However, talent shortages are likely to grow as demand for new skills accelerates and demographic gaps in educational attainment persist. The lack of quality jobs and a high cost of living further impact talent attraction and retention. For the region to remain competitive, an inclusive economic development strategy is needed. As part of San Diego’s Inclusive Growth Initiative, this research was produced by San Diego Regional EDC.

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Study: Addressing San Diego’s Affordability Crisis

Summary

In an effort to address San Diego’s soaring cost of living, San Diego Regional EDC and its Inclusive Growth Steering Committee of 40 employers officially endorsed a regional goal to create 75,000 newly thriving households by 2030. Driven by the findings in EDC’s latest study release, this regional goal and accompanying set of recommendations aim to address key factors (housing, transportation and childcare) impacting San Diego’s affordability crisis – the last of three main goals of a regional Inclusive Growth agenda.

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San Diego Economic Pulse – September 2019

Each month the California Employment Development Department (EDD) releases employment data for the prior month. This edition of San Diego’s Economic Pulse covers August 2019. Check out EDC’s research bureau for more data and stats about San Diego’s economy.

This report is sponsored by Manpower San Diego.

  • The region’s unemployment rate was 3.4 percent in August, down from a revised 3.6 percent in July 2019, and below the year-ago estimate of 3.5 percent..
  • The region’s unemployment rate remains lower than both the state and national unemployment rates of 4.2 percent and 3.8 percent, respectively
  • Construction (up 2,900) added the largest number of jobs over the month, with gains centered in speciality trade contractors(up 1,800)
  • Between August 2018 and August 2019, total nonfarm employment increased from 1,485,300 to 1,512,700, adding 27,400 jobs.
  • Government (up 8,400) followed by professional & business services(up 6,600) led job growth during the past year

San Diego Economic Pulse – August 2019

Each month the California Employment Development Department (EDD) releases employment data for the prior month. This edition of San Diego’s Economic Pulse covers July 2019. Check out EDC’s research bureau for more data and stats about San Diego’s economy.

This report is sponsored by Manpower San Diego.
Highlights include:

San Diego’s Economic Pulse – August 2019 from San Diego Regional EDC on Vimeo.

  • The region’s unemployment rate was 3.6 percent in July, up from a revised 3.3 percent in June 2019, and unchanged compared with the year-ago estimate of 3.6 percent.
  • The region’s unemployment rate remains lower than both the state and national unemployment rates of 4.4 percent and 4.0 percent, respectively
  • Leisure and hospitality (up 2,600) added the largest number of jobs over the month, driven in part due to the influx in tourism in the summer months
  • Between July 2018 and July 2019, total nonfarm employment increased from 1,480,300 to 1,510,000, adding 29,700 jobs.
  • Government (up 9,100) followed by professional & business services(up 8,400) led job growth during the past year

San Diego’s Economic Pulse – July 2019

Each month the California Employment Development Department (EDD) releases employment data for the prior month. This edition of San Diego’s Economic Pulse covers June 2019. Check out EDC’s research bureau for more data and stats about San Diego’s economy.

This report is sponsored by Manpower San Diego.

Highlights include:

San Diego’s Economic Pulse: July 2019 from San Diego Regional EDC on Vimeo.

  • The region’s unemployment rate was 3.3 percent in June, up from a revised 2.7 percent in May 2019, and below the year-ago estimate of 3.6 percent
  • The region’s unemployment rate remains lower than both the state and national unemployment rates of 4.1 percent and 3.8 percent, respectively
  • Between May 2019 and June 2019, total nonfarm employment increased from 1,510,200 to 1,517,300, adding 7,100 jobs
  • Between June 2018 and June 2019, total nonfarm employment increased from 1,491,600 to 1,517,600, adding 25,700 jobs
  • Between June 2018 and June 2019, professional and business services led the year-over gain, adding 8,000 jobs and mostly driven by growth in professional, scientific, and technical services (up 7,100).

The Small Business Ecosystem Along the 78 Corridor

Summary

Small businesses, which represent approximately 98 percent of all local companies, are the backbone of the regional economy. This initiative, which includes a survey of 164 businesses along the 78 Corridor, seeks to uncover insight and gain a deeper understanding of small business perceptions of the regional business climate. The end goal is to develop new and enhance existing programming and support for small businesses in the 78 Corridor. For the purpose of this survey, small businesses are defined as having fewer than 100 employees.

This study was underwritten by Innovate78.

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An In-Depth Look at San Diego’s Small Business Ecosystem

Summary

Small businesses – those with fewer than 100 employees – are the backbone of the regional economy. This initiative, which includes a survey of 522 small businesses across San Diego and Imperial counties, seeks to uncover insight and gain a deeper understanding of small business perceptions of the regional business climate. The end goal is to develop new and enhance existing programming and support for small businesses in the region. This report was commissioned by the Small Business Development Center (SBDC).

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Trade and Competitiveness in North America: A Focus on the Cali Baja Mega-Region

Summary

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was enacted on January 1, 1994, and was the first reciprocal agreement of its kind between industrial and developing countries. Broadly, the agreement sought to lower trade barriers and increase trade and investment between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. This report uses available data to analyze and illuminate how NAFTA has heightened economic competitiveness across North America and spurred growth in Cali Baja’s innovation economy, making it one of the most beneficial and significant trade agreements in history.

This report was produced by World Trade Center San Diego, supported by the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego School of Global Policy & Strategy and El Colegio de la Frontera Norte.

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