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Talent and Universities

February 4, 2015

Leading up to San Diego’s Global Summit on March 11, we’ll be giving a rundown of some panelists, guest speakers and programs involved in the Summit every Wednesday.

UCSD Picture

From launching the region’s first biotech company in 1978 to creating companies which continue to drive the region’s innovation economy, UC San Diego elevates San Diego’s global profile. They have been ranked in the top 20 universities in the world.

“With more than $3.8 billion in total revenues, and over 650 companies launched by UC San Diego alumni, faculty and staff, UC San Diego is an economic engine that helps to drive the future of our region,” said Dr. Pradeep Khosla, chancellor at UC San Diego.

UC San Diego’s impact on the region cannot be overstated. It accounts for more than 60 percent of all bio-related degrees conferred from regional institutions. Its researchers attract more than $1 billion in funding to cure diseases and create some of the most innovative healthcare solutions. Each of these contributes a tremendous amount to San Diego’s rank nationally as one of the top biotech regions.

It doesn’t stop at the biotech industry. UC San Diego’s engineering program ranks 14th in the nation and 18th in the world. According to UC San Diego, startup companies created out of the university reported more than $31.6 billion in annual sales in 2012-2013.

How do these thousands of students from UC San Diego and the region’s institutions contribute to San Diego’s global profile?

When you look at the top 20 most populous metropolitan regions in the nation, San Diego ranks 2nd in percent of college grads with STEM degrees, 5th in percent of population with a doctorate degree or higher, and 3rd in the world in patents per million residents, San Diego stands tall as one of the premier destinations for innovative companies to locate and expand their footprint.

Businesses from around the nation and world continue to want to locate in San Diego because of the incredible talent funneled out of the region’s institutions. More than 200,000 students currently study at the region’s world-renowned institutions. These students go on to start their own businesses or work for some of the most creative and disruptive companies the world has seen.

UC San Diego, especially Dean Peter Cowhey and his staff at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, has been an integral partner since the beginning. It assisted in the development of the original Global San Diego Export Plan, released early 2014, and the global trade and investment plan to be released on March 11. Its students and staff assessed the region’s export market and dug deep into the region’s foreign direct investment dollars and jobs supported by foreign firms.

At San Diego’s Global Summit on March 11, Chancellor Khosla will join other community leaders to discuss San Diego’s competitiveness when attracting the smartest and most inventive individuals on the planet.

More information on March 11 is available here.

 


Join us as we formally launch San Diego's Global Summit, a global competitiveness initiative, on March 11. Subscribe here to receive new posts every Wednesday on this topic.

 

January 14, 2015
The post below is part of an on-going series leading up to San Diego's Global Summit, a global competitiveness initiative EDC will formally launch on March 11. Subscribe here to receive new posts every Wednesday on this topic.
 
A revolution is stirring in America. Like all great revolutions, one starts with a simple but profound truth: Cities and metropolitan areas are the engines of economic prosperity and social transformation in the United States.” – Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley, The Metropolitan Revolution
 
The Great Recession had profound impacts on the national economy: businesses closed; unemployment increased; homes were liquidated. The U.S. experienced the repercussions of taking on large debt and focusing on consumption rather than production, innovation, and entrepreneurship. 

metro revolutaion

Enter Bruce Katz.  
Katz wrote The Metropolitan Revolution as a response to the inaction of the federal government to move the national economy in the right direction. Metropolitan regions, Katz argues, will drive the future growth and prosperity of the U.S. economy, not the federal government.
 
The top 100 metropolitan regions of the United States hold only 12 percent of the total land mass but they account for more than 66 percent of the nation’s population. With this high concentration of people, these economic powerhouses account for 75 percent of the entire country’s GDP, and 78 percent the nation’s patents - a sign of regions' innovative power. 

 

Top 100 metros

Credit: The Brookings Institute 

Putting words into action, Katz and his team at the Metropolitan Policy Program launched the Global Cities Initiative, a five-year project of Brookings and JPMorgan Chase aimed at helping the leaders of metropolitan areas strengthen their regional economies by becoming more competitive in the global marketplace.

On March 11, EDC and partners will publicly launch San Diego's Global Summit presented by JP Morgan Chase with Katz by our side. Katz will be keynoting the event , where he will discuss San Diego’s – and other metros’ – strength in the global economy. In particular, his keynote will discuss San Diego's ability to innovate and adapt to world-changing events and grow its economy.

More information about San Diego's Global Summit on March 11 is available here.

Leading up to March 11, we’ll be giving a rundown of some panelists, guest speakers and programs involved in San Diego's Global Summit every Wednesday on our blog.

Next week: where does San Diego stack up when it comes to its ranking in the national economy? Here’s a hint:  We’re 17th in GDP and population, but 61st in export intensity. As a region,we have the opportunity to change this.

November 14, 2014

GlobalCitiesInitiative

As part of San Diego Regional EDC’s work to increase the region’s global competitiveness, a delegation of San Diegans will head to Munich, Germany next week to explore innovation strategies to strengthen advanced manufacturing. Representing a mix of academia, industry, and business organizations, the delegation will tour some of Munich’s most innovative companies, including BMW and Siemens, and meet with German leaders including the Honorable Dieter Reiter, Mayor of Munich.

Germany – where manufacturing represents nearly twice the share of employment as in the United States – offers an illustrative model for industry growth and workforce development. Its manufacturing firms rely on a robust dual model of vocational education and on-the-job training to sustain a highly-trained workforce and powerful public-private collaborations to support continuous innovation.

San Diego – much like Munich – has the talent, innovation and vision to compete and lead in the global marketplace,” said Mark Cafferty, president and CEO of San Diego Regional EDC, one of the delegates on the trip. “Both San Diego and Munich have harnessed the power of public/private collaboration to fuel economic growth. Our trip to Munich will help us advance our local innovation economy.

Cafferty will be joined by Monique Rodriguez, director of government affairs, Qualcomm, Inc.; Ian Wendlandt, chief of staff, Stone Brewing Company; and Mary Walshok, associate vice chancellor for public programs and dean of extension at UC San Diego.

In addition to stops at BMW and Siemens, the agenda also includes tours at small and medium-sized manufacturers. Delegates will also engage in panel discussions centered around manufacturing and innovation featuring the Hon. John Emerson, U.S. Ambassador to Germany and Bruce Katz, co-director of the Global Cities Initiative among others. Representatives from Chicago, Louisville-Lexington, Nashville, Phoenix and Portland will also be joining the trip.

The City of Munich plays an important role in San Diego’s global competitiveness. Munich is the region’s sixth largest source of foreign investment; companies with Munich-based operations employ 1,222 people in San Diego. From an industry standpoint, Munich and San Diego excel in cleantech, advanced manufacturing, life sciences, information and communication technologies and other innovative fields.

The trip is part of San Diego’s participation in the Global Cities Initiative (GCI), a joint effort between the Brookings Institution and JPMorgan Chase that aims to help cities and metropolitans enhance their global competitiveness. San Diego joined GCI in 2012.

JPMorgan Chase has a longstanding commitment to helping cities thrive,” said Peter Kaldes, head of the Global Cities Initiative at JPMorgan Chase, who will be joining the trip. “We are thrilled to bring together U.S. and German city leaders who we hope will forge new economic bonds and, in the process, help their cities grow.”

In April 2014, as part of the GCI, San Diego was one of six U.S. cities selected to participate in a pilot program to develop a foreign direct investment (FDI) plan. A jobs generator, foreign-owned companies employ nearly 50,000 workers in San Diego, paying above average U.S. wages.                                                                                

In early 2015, the GCI will convene in San Diego to launch a comprehensive global trade and investment plan. 

October 24, 2014

Across the globe, cities are forging a new kind of battle. They are competing for talent.

Metros understand that it’s talent, more than any other factor, that will drive business location decisions. If they want to grow their economy, they need to grow their talent pool first.

A new study from the City Observatory, “The Young and the Restless and the Nation’s Cities,” takes an in-depth look at the migration patterns of the young, educated millennial population (age 25-34) in cities since 2000. Young workers – especially those with bachelor’s degrees – are the most mobile subset of the American workforce. They are not just looking for any job; they are looking for a job in a city where they can envision building a life and a career.

The report reads, “We’ve witnessed an inversion of the classic recipe for economic development: it used to be that people moved to where the businesses were. Now, increasingly, it is businesses that look to expand in locations where there is an abundance of talent, especially young, well-educated workers.”

So the brings us to our next question – exactly where does San Diego stack up when it comes to its ability to attract talent? Here’s what the report tells us:

  • Between 2000 - 2010, there was a 91 percent increase in the number of 25-34 year olds that reside in close-in neighborhoods in San Diego. Close-in neighborhoods are defined as those within three miles of the center of the central business district of each metropolitan area.
  • San Diego saw disproportionately larger increases in well-educated young adults than the overall population. There was a 43 percent increase from 2002-2012 in terms of the number of 25-34 year olds that hold four-year degrees. To put it in comparison, the overall U.S. average grew by slightly more than 25 percent.
  • Cities and entrepreneurship go together. Venture capital investment appears to be increasingly flowing to startup firms located in urban settings. The urban share of venture capital in San Diego is above 80 percent.

The numbers speak for themselves: San Diego is doing well when it comes to attracting educated talent between the ages of 25-34. But we must not take this for granted. If the region wants to continue to be known for innovation, we must ensure we are attracting the right people to the region.

With the help of many partners, EDC currently has a multi-faceted global identity program underway to ensure that we continue to lead the pack in talent attraction and retention. This represents a shift in our previous marketing efforts, which were aimed at c-level decision makers.  We will be sharing more about the program in the coming weeks. For recent analysis from EDC, please see our July and October Quarterly Snapshots, which looked deeper into San Diego's comparative advantages and challenges in the talent race. 

We know that San Diego is a magnet for talent, investment and capital – our job now is making sure that message gets to the rest of the world.

Some media outlets including The New York Times have taken a closer look at the report.

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May 20, 2014
San Diego Digital Ambassadors Everybody recognizes San Diego’s enviable weather, but one of our greatest competitive strengths lies in the people who call this place home. San Diego is full of really smart people solving hard problems, making cool things and changing lives. This is the story we need to tell.
 
So, we've gone straight to the source. The videos below are part of our broader workforce talent attraction and retention efforts. They are not branded to EDC. We encourage you to share the videos on social media using the hashtag #GoSanDiego and stay tuned for information about a new talent attraction website, vimeo channel and our digital ambassadors program.

Tweet Worthy:

  • "We were in Vegas, but we saw a huge opportunity here...so we moved our company to DT SD"
  • Why SD? "We wanted to be around companies we could collaborate with & bounce ideas off of"

In search of opportunity and quality of life, Brandisty co-founders Alex Rolek and Michael Sacca decided to move their company from Las Vegas to San Diego. What they found in San Diego is an attainable quality of life and a growing startup community that fosters collaboration. 

Meet Michael Sacca, Brandisty from GoSanDiego on Vimeo

Check out Brandisty: brandisty.com

 

Tweet Worthy:

  • "I can only see that SD's tech community is going to get bigger and better"
While at UC San Diego, David Fischer became fascinated with home brewing after exposure to the growing San Diego craft beer movement.  Back then, he had an equally fascinating internship as a developer at Qualcomm. After successfully progressing at Qualcomm, he took a job at Amazon in Irvine and commuted via train. Fast forward a few years: David learned of a job opportunity here in San Diego combining two things he loves: programming and craft beer. This is David’s story at TapHunter, one of San Diego’s many growing startups.
 

Meet David Fischer, TapHunter from GoSanDiego on Vimeo.

Check out TapHunter and download the app: TapHunter.com

 

 

 

April 15, 2014

Jacobs School Research EXPO UCSD

Capital can be a pain point for many entrepreneurs. Despite the odds, many San Diego companies have found funding. According to the PricewaterhouseCoopers MoneyTree report, San Diego companies were involved in 23 venture capital deals and received more than $145 million in funding in Q4 of 2013. However, for a variety of reasons, overall venture capital invested in San Diego still took a dip between 2012 and 2013.

A group of alumni of the University of California, San Diego may help change that. They have created a venture capital fund—the Triton Technology Fund—that is specifically focused on commercializing innovations by UC San Diego faculty, students and alumni. (Read the Xconomy story here.)

The Triton Technology Fund will invest in companies affiliated with UC San Diego faculty, students and alumni with innovations in the software, communications, electronics, materials, medical devices and instruments sectors. The goal is to leverage breakthroughs in these areas to provide solutions for business-to-business enterprises.

“Commercializing university research requires external expertise and investment. The Triton Technology Fund is going to accelerate the success of our innovators by injecting crucial resources into our entrepreneurism and commercialization initiatives here at the Jacobs School of Engineering and across all of UC San Diego and its alumni networks,” said Albert P. Pisano, Dean of the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering in a statement announcing the fund.

The university is a breeding ground for ideas and innovation. To date, UC San Diego faculty and alumni have been credited with forming more than 500 startup companies. Some of these innovations can be seen in action this Thursday when the Jacobs School of Engineering hosts its annual Research Expo event. UC San Diego engineering graduate students will present their latest research at the 200-strong poster session at Research Expo on Thursday April 17 from 2:00 to 4:30 pm on the UC San Diego campus. (You can scan poster titles or search by industry application area online.)

The Jacobs School of Engineering’s Research Expo, now in its 33rd year, also includes ten-minute faculty tech talks covering regenerative medicine, big data, video processing for medical applications, robotics education, wearable sensors, and aerospace safety. Registration is available onsite.

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April 8, 2014
 
San Diego is not Silicon Valley...and that's a good thing. Yes, the weather here is nicer, but that's not the only reason people come here. They come for access to resources, lower cost of living compared to other startup hubs, and of course, talent. Like many other tech founders, Stephan Goss, CEO of Zeeto Media and Jeff Brice, CEO of TrustEgg believe this so much, that they decided to locate their companies here. 
 
There is always room for improvement, but as San Diego's startup community continues to grow, so does the momentum we see to better the region. Take a look at the piece they wrote below for The Daily Transcript.
 
 

Why we chose San Diego over Silicon Valley (appeared in The Daily Transcript on April 7) by StephanGoss and Jeff Brice
It is conventional wisdom that if you want to launch a startup, Silicon Valley is the place to be. The funding, talent and resources are available in spades there. So people have flocked there hoping to become the next Facebook or Google, and some have succeeded.
 
We made a different choice. For us, San Diego was a smarter choice to launch our two businesses, Zeeto Media, an online media company, and TrustEgg, a simple venue to start online trust accounts for kids. The weather was certainly a seductive draw. It’s hard to ignore the climate and laid-back lifestyle of this Southern California city, but that is not why we are here. 
 
Read more in the Daily Transcript....

#GoSanDiego

 

March 13, 2014

It’s EDC’s job to be a booster of all-things San Diego. Through our work, we get the opportunity to meet budding entrepreneurs and small businesses owners.  They differ in the types of enterprises they run and in the people they hire, but they all say one thing: San Diego is a great place to launch a startup or small business.  We know that San Diego has many ingredients for entrepreneurs to be successful -- from a top tier talent pool to diverse neighborhoods which help attract the right people -- but we haven’t had a definitive ranking that said it all. Now we do: Today, Forbes ranked San Diego “The Best Place to Launch a Startup in 2014.”

San Diego is the best place to launch a startup in 2014. We’ll give that a moment to sink in.

One of the criteria used to rank location is based on social media use of small businesses in the selected city. As the article writes, “It turns out that Internet-savvy businesses are likely to grow faster than those that don’t…. Web presence indicates adaptability and likelihood to innovate—creating a network effect for communities dedicated to growth and positive change.” There’s no doubt that San Diego has its share of social media-savvy entrepreneurs and small business owners.  Recognizing this, EDC has recently brought together a group of these “Digital Ambassadors” to help carry positive messages about the region to the rest of the world. We’re constantly amazed about the powerful things we learn about San Diego through social media every day.  Just yesterday, we learned that Google Analytics got its start in San Diego as Urchin.

Here’s a little more about what Forbes had to say about the region:

"Small enterprises ranked in the top five on nearly every category to lift San Diego into the top slot. There is heavy concentration in projected high growth industries, as well as a high likelihood of accepting credit cards and adopting social media. San Diego is home to the fifth-best rated business community in the country. “

Although we have often been known to criticize the methodology of “rankings,” we need to celebrate where we can. And today, we celebrate!  San Diego Is, in fact, the best place to launch a startup in 2014.

Now, let’s continue to use our award-winning social media skills to get the word out.


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January 31, 2014

global sd cover

Throughout the nation, and the world, the role of metropolitans is becoming more pronounced. Due in part to political gridlock in D.C., metropolitans have become living incubators for ideas and innovation. Although the rise of the metropolitan region can be seen by anyone who picks up the paper or flips on the T.V., it’s the Brookings Institute that has given this movement new momentum.

San Diego is one region to embrace this "metropolitan first" ethos. This week, EDC – along with numerous regional partners – released the “Global San Diego Export Plan” which focuses on growing our metropolitan economy and creating jobs through exports. The release of the export plan is part of San Diego’s continued participation in the Global Cities Initiative, a joint project of the Brookings Institute and JPMorgan Chase & Co.

In 2012, San Diego was selected by Washington-based Brookings Institute as one of the first eight U.S. cities to participate in a national initiative to pioneer new strategies that boost exports and global economic competitiveness. The Global Cities Exchange has now grown to include 20 U.S. metropolitan areas.

A focus on exports means a focus on all sectors of San Diego’s economy, from the established defense and communications sectors to emerging industries such as craft beer. Companies that export not only grow faster, but are 8.5 percent less likely to go out of business. Additionally, if you work at a company that exports, on average, you will earn a 10-20 percent higher wage than you would if you worked at a company that didn’t export.

San Diego’s Core Team Partners are streamlining four strategies to implement the export plan:

·         Leveraging the diversity of regional markets

·         Developing and increasing small- and-medium-sized enterprises’ capacity to export

·         Concentrating on San Diego’s unique infrastructure assets

·         Leveraging the trade potential of the CaliBaja Bi-National Mega Region

A newly-formed Global Competitiveness Council, comprised of key leadership from the Core Team Partners including elected officials and university leadership, will move forward on implementation of the strategies and provide insight into the region’s trade and investment plans.

In San Diego, we’re not just exporting San Diego products; we’re exporting San Diego culture as well. Core Team Partners have included a Global Outreach component to encourage San Diegans to adopt a more global mindset and use this initiative as a platform for communicating San Diego’s global fluency.

In the coming weeks, the Core Team will continue to push out information regarding San Diego’s plan to increase exports.

In the meantime, here’s what Brookings and some members of the Global Competitiveness Council are saying about this plan:

Brad McDearman, fellow and director of Metro Trade and Investment at Brookings said: “San Diego was selected to be part of the Global Cities Exchange due to its unique cross-border dynamic, Pacific Rim location, demonstrated regional collaboration, and commitment to being more intentional about positioning the region globally. San Diego is a region with tremendous potential in international markets.”

Councilmember Mark Kersey, City of San Diego, 5th District said: “Expanding trade opportunities for San Diego companies is critical to our binational economy. Although we currently have companies utilizing our regional opportunities for trade and commerce, there is a lot more potential. This initiative will provide businesses with concrete information to help them tap into the unique opportunities being a border region provides," said

Thella Bowens, president and CEO of San Diego County Regional Airport Authority said: “The Airport Authority is pleased to see the concrete steps laid out in this plan to improve our region’s export potential, based on the market assessment completed last spring. In terms of air passengers, air cargo and aviation infrastructure, San Diego International Airport plays a crucial role in our region’s export performance. We are committed to working with our partner agencies and the City of San Diego to enhance the export potential of the region”

Mark Cafferty, president and CEO or San Diego Regional EDC said: “We know companies that export not only pay their workforce higher wages, but also create more jobs. This plan is a solid foundation to not only boost employment, but to also start shaping the region’s distinct global identity. The good news is that we have room to grow.”

Brennon Crist, JPMorgan Chase market manager for Middle Market/Commercial Banking said: "Exports of goods and services represent a tremendous opportunity for San Diego businesses to grow and create jobs. The strategies outlined in this Export Plan will be instrumental to helping our region’s employers realize their export potential. The plan serves as a great example of the public-private sector collaboration that’s so critical to ensuring our region’s long-term economic success in a highly competitive global economy.”

Bob Nelson, chairman, Port of San Diego said: “Leaders throughout San Diego share a desire to improve our region’s competitiveness in global markets, which is driven in large part by our goods movement capacity at the Port of San Diego. With two marine cargo terminals, the Port of San Diego is a major player in our region’s export activity. The release of our Brookings Institution Metropolitan Export Plan signals that our San Diego region as a whole is serious about offering businesses a simpler, easier path to exporting – and that we’re willing to work together to get there.”

More statements can be found here.

TAGS
December 31, 2013
The story of the San Diego region is one of collaboration. This means when events take an unexpected turn, we can lean on one another to move the region forward. We have companies - that many would perceive as competitors - working together to secure San Diego’s cyber infrastructure. We have public/private collaborations working to increase the region’s global footprint. We have everyone from entrepreneurs to Fortune 500 companies looking to invest in the region. And we have a strong group of universities that are working together to produce one of the most talented workforces in the nation.
 
 “Good News” is all around us. For the second year in a row, we've compiled a list of some of the greatest moments of the year. As 2013 draws to an end, let’s reflect on the remarkable accomplishments across our entire mega-region, and raise a toast (preferably a San Diego craft beer) to another year of positive headlines.
 
With unwavering appreciation,
Team EDC
 

 

Convention Center expansion is green lighted
In October, a coalition of local union members, business leaders and elected officials showed up at the California Coastal Commission hearing to advocate for a the expansion of the San Diego Convention Center. When the Coastal Commission voted unanimously to move forward with the expansion, they were not only voting for a larger facility with more waterfront access, but also to bring an additional $698 million in economic impact and 6,685 jobs in the region. The expansion of the Convention Center means we can make way for many of the mega-conventions, such as Comic-con, that had their San Diego presence threatened by lack of capacity

 

Unmanned Center of Excellence adds 300 jobs to economy
San Diego has emerged as an Unmanned Systems hub. Recognizing the talent and opportunities present in the region, Defense innovator Northrop Grumman designated San Diego its Unmanned Systems Center of Excellence. The designation meant 300 more jobs at the company's Rancho Bernardo location.

 

 

San Diego Central Library completed 
A great city needs a great library. With the completion of the San Diego Central Library, San Diego residents now have a library they are proud of. The new East Village location boasts local art installations, an expanded career center, a charter school, and more workspace, in in a visually stunning iconic building.

 

 

 


We live in the most inventive region in the U.S. 
Although we've tried not to focus on rankings, this is one we simply can't ignore. In July, the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development released its ranking of the world's most inventive cities. Second on the list - right behind Eindoven, Netherlands - was San Diego. The city claims 8.9 patents for every 10,000 residents, thanks to companies such as Qualcomm. 

 

 

 

Cross Border terminal makes Mega-Region more accessible 
As the U.S. and Mexican governments launch a new initiative to build stronger business ties across the border, they are looking at San Diego's Cali Baja Bi-national Mega-Region as a model for finding ways that industry clusters in both countries can work together. Many examples show the strength of the mega-region, but it's the new cross border terminal that has grabbed headlines recently. Border infrastructure has been improving, and the new cross border terminal will allow travelers from San Diego and Tijuana to hop on flights out of the neighboring cities. 

 

 

San Diego Airport's Green Build takes off
Improvements at the airport have finally landed. The San Diego International Airport's Green Build expansion culminated in August ahead of schedule and under budget. The stunning new new terminal features 10 new gates, pet-friendly amenities, extensive public art displays and is infused with local dining favorites so travelers can get a taste of San Diego while they wait. 

 

 

 

Pivot to the Pacific sends resources to San Diego
The United States defense strategy has deemed that a Pivot to the Pacific, aligning defense resources with the Pacific Rim, is a crucial foreign policy strategy. Because of San Diego's location and existing military footprint, this meant the region was well-positioned, despite sequestration, to gain valuable resources. The USS Reagan and its 2,500 person crew returned to San Diego after a year in maintenance. The USS Vinson, and its 6,000 plus crew, also returned to its port in San Diego. According the SDMAC Military Economic Impact Study, the two aircraft carriers home ported here will each add about $500 million to the economy.

 

 

 

Kickstarter backed films puts San Diego on Hollywood's radar
San Diego may never be Hollywood (we're fine with owning technology and innovation), but a few features have put the region on the map. The year started with 'Inocente', a story about a homeless San Diego teen, becoming the first Kickstarter backed movie to win an Oscar. Fans turned to Kickstarter again to fund a film version of 'Veronica Mars,' a series that chronicles the life of a teenage San Diego detective. The trailer premiered at Comic-con in July. Although San Diego's favorite fictional news team may not have been backed by Kickstarter, with the release of Anchorman 2, the phrase "Stay Classy, San Diego" worked its way back into lexicon this year.

 

 

 

Intellect leads innovation economy
San Diego's top tier universities are essential for priming a talented workforce that helps push the economy forward. When President Obama announced his BRAIN initiative in April, UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. was invited to Washington. Given its strong cognitive sciences program, the university - which raked in more than $1 billion in research funding this past year - will be one of the academic institutions leading the charge. Cal State San Marcos welcomed its biggest class and held true to its 'vet' friendly reputation.  San Diego State University found itself among the nation's highest ranked universities in terms of affordability and ROI, which may be one of the reasons it recently announced a record number of applicants for 2014. Point Loma Nazarene has been identified as one of the best value private colleges in the U.S. University of San Diego's part time MBA programs broke the Top 20 on BusinessWeek's list. Online education pioneer Ashford University partnered with Forbes to create cutting-edge materials for its Forbes School of Business. National University, a leader in policy research, has partnered with EDC and other regional organizations on studies to quantify the sports and active lifestyle and cybersecurity clusters. 

Construction on desalination project begins

Construction on the largest desalination plant in the western hemisphere began in early 2013. The construction of the plant will provide more than 2,300 jobs and will sustain 575 jobs when it is completed in 2016. Not only does the Carlsbad facility employ ground-breaking local technologies, but it also promises to transform about 50 million gallons of seawater into drinking water each day, which will meet 7 to 10 percent of San Diego’s water needs.

 

 

 

Brookings lays framework for global competitiveness strategy
Last fall, San Diego was selected as one of eight U.S. cities to participate in the Brookings Metropolitan Exchange Initiative, a project that helps regions implement customized export plans. In May, a collaborative made up of representatives from the Port of San Diego, San Diego Regional Airport Authority, UC San Diego, JP Morgan Chase and others came together to release a market assessment, the first phase in delivering a plan. Since then, working groups have been addressing infrastructure, talent, small and medium-sized enterprises, and market diversity to come up with a plan to boost the region's exports. The collaborative will release the final export plan - which will help with the region's overall global competitiveness strategy - in early 2014.

Craft Beer powers regional economy
Look out Munich, we're nipping at your heels. The San Diego region, which is home to more than 70 craft breweries, is commanding a growing percent of the nation's craft beer production. The region embraced its craft beer culture, with places like the Airport integrating beer into in the region's identity. From Men's Journal to The New York Times, people worldwide are also catching wind of breweries such as Stone, Ballast Point, Karl Strauss. This year, the industry hosted its first "SD Craft Beer Hospitality and Tourism Summit" to talk about how San Diego can propel its image as a premier craft beer destination forward.