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The Big Picture San Diego Blog


SeaWorld San Diego

April 24, 2015

While San Diego is known to the rest of the world as “America’s Finest City,” it also happens to be one of the world’s smartest cities.

At least that’s the way the National Geographic Channel sees it. San Diego is featured in Nat Geo’s “World’s Smart Cities” documentary, a one-hour documentary special uncovering what makes this unique city one of the most innovative, forward thinking cities across the globe. The documentary begins airing tomorrow on the Nat Geo Channel at 8 a.m.

In anticipation of tomorrow’s public premiere, we’ve pulled together 9 reasons Nat Geo calls us a Smart City.

Here it goes:

  1. We don’t just drink beer, we make it too.

    Home to nearly 100 craft breweries, San Diego is serious about suds. But it’s not just about drinking it; it’s also about brewing it. In the documentary, you’ll meet Neva Parker, director of laboratory operations at White Labs, who talks about cultivating brewer’s yeast, a key ingredient in the brewing process.
     
  1. Our grid is smart.

    Today, 32 percent of San Diego’s electricity is renewable, and there is no coal in SDG&E’s energy portfolio. Jim Avery of Sempra Energy discusses the Smart Grid which increases the use of renewable energy and helps manage the region’s power.
     
  1. Our port makes us a  “plug-in.”

    Speaking of clean energy, the Port has fully switched to a shore-power system that improves air quality and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by allowing cargo vessels to "plug in" rather than run their diesel engines while in port.  You can catch some sweeping views of the 10th Avenue Marine Terminal in the documentary.
     
  1. We cultivate the innovators of the future.

    Most San Diegans know the story of Qualcomm, the region’s largest private-sector employer, but what many people in San Diego (and across the world) don’t know is about their focus on cultivating future leaders. In the documentary, Host Andrew Evans visits Qualcomm® Thinkabit Lab™, equal parts innovation lab and art studio, that provides students from all cultural and socio-economic backgrounds in San Diego with access to hands-on experiences in engineering. They are ensuring San Diego remains a “smart city” for generations to come.
     
  1. We’re home to one of the smartest universities in the world…and they just created the world’s first algae-based surfboard.

    UC San Diego campus is one of the top 15 research universities in the world and is an innovator nationally in solar and other renewable technologies. At the California Center for Algae Biotechnology, which host Andrew Evans visits, UC San Diego researcher Stephen Mayfield is turning pond scum into fuel for the next generation of transportation. He also turned this pond scum into the world’s first algae-based surfboard, which he showed off at the San Diego premiere Tuesday evening.
     
  1. Innovation is in our DNA.

    When it comes to the field of genomics, San Diego is second to none. Evans pays a visit to Illumina, the first company that cracked the $1,000 genome challenge, to get his DNA mapped by Chief Medical Officer Rick Klausner. Illumina was called the “World’s Smartest Company” ahead of Samsung, Google and Tesla by MIT Technology Review. It’s no coincidence the “World’s Smartest company” is headquartered in one of the “World’s Smart Cities.”
     
  1. We make the things that go where no man can go.

    From the frozen Arctic to the coast of Africa, the Northrop Grumman-built NASA Global Hawk has flown all over the globe conducting unprecedented scientific and environmental missions. Evans explores San Diego’s dynamic aerospace industry through the eyes of Northrop Grumman, where he has the opportunity to meet with George Guerra, an unmanned aircraft expert.
     
  1. Lifesaving innovations are applied to multiple fields.

    SeaWorld is more than just a theme park operator – they’re also an innovator. In the documentary, we meet Todd Schmitt, senior veterinarian at SeaWorld, who discusses SeaWorld’s Zoological Stem Cell Bank Initiative which contributes to the scientific advancement of stem cell use in marine species and has the potential to replace drugs in the treatment of many chronic diseases, especially in older animals.
     
  1. Our people care.

    San Diego resident Rob Machado is a surfing hall of famer and legend. Yet rather than focusing on his sport and why it’s important to the culture of San Diego, he chose to focus on the volunteer work that he and others are doing through the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) to help children with disabilities learn to surf, develop confidence in themselves and connect with the ocean and nature.

It’s easy to see that San Diego is more than just the beach. Make sure not to miss out on the full picture, see why we’re one of the “World’s Smart Cities.” The program will air Saturday, April 25, 8-9 a.m., and Saturday, May 2, 8-9 a.m., on the National Geographic Channel.

November 18, 2014

SeaWorld San Diego

People across the globe – and in San Diego - know SeaWorld.  But what many people don’t know is their deep commitment to the communities they serve. In addition to hosting EDC’s Annual Dinner last year, SeaWorld San Diego is involved in many programs that bolster our economy. Through various community initiatives, they have demonstrated their commitment to putting youth to work and conserving many of the region’s resources.

We sat down with John Reilly, park president at SeaWorld San Diego and Aquatica Chula Vista, to learn more about the company’s broad reach.

1) Tell us about SeaWorld San Diego
Most San Diegans have heard of SeaWorld. Animals, shows, rides, Shamu —that’s all true, but most people don’t know how deeply SeaWorld affects the lives of park visitors. Jody Westberg visited the park as a youngster and dreamed of working with marine life. Today she heads SeaWorld’s animal rescue program, dedicating her life to giving ill and injured animals a second chance. Jenna Golden visited SeaWorld as a student enrolled in one of our camps. During college Jenna returned to the park as an Educator, and she now teaches youngsters about conservation and how their actions affect the world’s oceans.  Kristi Burtis grew up in San Diego and enjoyed numerous Shamu shows as a child. Today she trains the park’s killer whales and shares the special bond she has with the animals with millions of visitors.  So what does SeaWorld do?  We entertain, educate, conserve and connect people with the natural world we share.  

2) What are some advantages to doing business in San Diego?
Why Sea World Chose San Diego SeaWorld has the good fortune of being located on beautiful Mission Bay. This awe inspiring location, expansive waterfront and adjacent coastal areas allow the park’s habitats and educational programs to impact the local community. The animal rescue program has tremendous access to local beaches for rescues and adjacent waterways to return healthy animals back to the wild. And, San Diego’s perfect weather, dining, shopping, beaches and world-class zoo make it a perfect place for tourists. Visitors from around the globe chose to holiday in San Diego. Few cities in America offer tourists such a vast array of activities and locales.   

3) San Diego is full of dynamic companies, firms and service providers influencing global trends and innovation. Pick another San Diego company that is at the top of its game.
The Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, an innovative, independent, non-profit organization seeking real life solutions to sea life problems, recently launched two projects that are sure to impact global initiatives. On the research front, Hubbs is documenting the influence of infectious and non-infectious diseases on free-ranging animals, including zoonotic diseases (those transmissible from animals to humans). Marine mammals may play a role similar to pigs as hosts for influenza viruses and future studies are aimed at better understanding these relationships. This research has the potential to impact future medical advances and solutions. On another front, Hubbs has embarked on an ambitious fish farming program. The United States is the third-largest consumer of seafood in the world, but we only produce about nine percent of it domestically.  Hubbs is proposing a creative solution that provides an alternative source of protein and a new paradigm in the seafood business. The project, which will start by raising about 1,000 tons of California yellowtail, could serve as a model for environmentally sustainable offshore aquaculture.

4) What do you anticipate for your company in five years? What do you anticipate for San Diego? 
John Reilly speaks at SeaWorld's 50th Anniversary Celebration in March This year SeaWorld celebrated its 50th anniversary and we could not be more excited about the park’s future. A few months ago we announced the Blue World project. Blue World includes a first-of-its-kind killer whale environment, an Independent Advisory Panel that will focus on creating something innovative that maximizes the health and wellbeing of the animals, $10 million in matching funds for killer whale research and a multi-million dollar partnership focused on ocean health. The Blue World habitat will build on SeaWorld’s legacy of providing state-of-the art homes for its animals, and will offer park guests unique and inspiring killer whale encounters for generations to come. This new environment will have a total water volume of 10 million gallons, a maximum depth of 50 feet, surface area of nearly 1.5 acres and views exceeding 40 feet in height providing guests with the world’s largest underwater viewing experience of killer whales. This tremendous new environment will enhance the educational experience for guests, foster deeper knowledge of killer whales and their ocean environment and inspire them to celebrate and conserve the natural world. Blue World will open summer, 2018 and we know San Diegans are going to be awestruck at the incredible vista and one-of-a-kind opportunity to see and learn about killer whales.

 

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